Activists hope to fly Trump baby balloon over president’s New Jersey golf club

The giant balloon portraying President Donald Trump as an angry baby that was flown next to the U.K. parliament in London might make it across the Atlantic.

A crowdfunding campaign, which has raised more than $14,000 in three days, aims to take the baby balloon to the Trump National golf course in Bedminster, New Jersey.

An activist identifying himself as Jim, from Hillsborough, New Jersey, stated on the “Baby Trump” page of the GoFundMe website: “I got together with local organizers of the People's Motorcade (campaign group) and we agreed we need to bring Baby Trump to Bedminster where he plays golf during the summer. With your generous donations we have exceeded our goal to purchase our Baby Trump from the U.K.”

The president spent time at the course last summer during White House renovations. “This is not a vacation — meetings and calls!” he tweeted on August 5.

The angry orange baby balloon caused controversy in the U.K. ahead of its appearance during Trump’s European visit last week. At first, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan did not authorize its use, but he then changed his mind after more than 10,000 people signed a petition calling for him to do so. It flew next to the Houses of Parliament in London on Friday.

Speaking to CNBC on Thursday, Drew Liquerman, the chairman of Republicans Overseas, said: “Some of these protests are quite embarrassing and cringeworthy, specifically the balloon.”

Sheila Menon, one of the organizers of the U.K. balloon, told CNBC's Steve Sedgwick on Friday that the protest became so popular because "so many people have a very strong opinion about President Trump.”

After its London appearance, the baby was flown over The Meadows, a park in Scotland’s capital Edinburgh, on Sunday while Trump was in that country. A paraglider who flew a Greenpeace banner over the Turnberry golf resort where the president stayed last weekend was arrested Sunday and has been released pending further investigation.

- CNBC's Silvia Amaro contributed to this report