Trump blasts Sessions for probes of GOP lawmakers as feud escalates

  • President Donald Trump criticized Jeff Sessions for investigations of two Republican lawmakers that could hurt the party's chances of holding on to their seats in November.
  • The feud between Trump and Sessions has been escalating in recent weeks.
  • Last month, Trump said Sessions will remain in his post until at least the midterm elections in November.
President Donald Trump (L) and Attorney General Jeff Sessions.
Getty Images
President Donald Trump (L) and Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

President Donald Trump Monday fired another round in a public feud with Attorney General Jeff Sessions, which has gone on for more than a year.

This time Trump criticized Sessions for investigations of two Republican lawmakers that could hurt the party's chances of holding on to their seats in November.

The comments were just some of those the president made throughout the day on the social media platform. Earlier, he celebrated Labor Day, criticized a key labor leader, saying he could understand why labor unions are doing so poorly. Then, in the afternoon, he weighed in on a possible presidential bid by former Secretary of State John Kerry.

"Two long running, Obama era, investigations of two very popular Republican Congressmen were brought to a well publicized charge, just ahead of the Mid-Terms, by the Jeff Sessions Justice Department," Trump tweeted, referring to charges against Trump supporters Reps. Chris Collins (R-N.Y.) and Duncan Hunter (R-Calif.). "Two easy wins now in doubt because there is not enough time. Good job Jeff."

This is not the first time Trump has taken to Twitter to criticize Sessions. Trump has faulted Sessions for not reining in what Trump has called special counsel Robert Mueller's "illegal investigation" into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Sessions fell out of favor with the president after he recused himself from the Russia investigation, which Trump has repeatedly labeled a "witch hunt."

Throughout August, the president's attacks on Sessions have escalated, however, the president recently told Bloomberg News that Sessions will remain in his post until at least the midterm elections in November.

Early last month, Collins was charged with securities fraud and lying to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Although he has denied the allegations, he suspended his reelection campaign in the wake of his arrest.

Meanwhile, Hunter and his wife, Margaret Hunter, have been accused of misusing campaign funds and concealing their actions by falsifying records to the Federal Election Commission. In a 48-page indictment, federal prosecutors said that between 2009 and 2016 the couple used more than $250,000 in campaign funds for personal expenses like a family vacation to Italy, golf outings and expensive meals.

Trump followed up his first tweet with a second that speculated that Democrats must "love" Sessions now. He also draw comparisons between Sessions and James Comey, who Trump says became more popular with Democrats after he was fired by Trump.

Although Trump said that no Democrats had supported Sessions' nomination for attorney general, he received one lone Democratic vote from Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.).

Earlier Monday, Trump took to Twitter to criticize AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, saying the labor leader had "represented his union poorly on television this weekend .... It is easy to see why unions are doing so poorly."

Trump also commented on the possibility of Kerry launching another bid for president.

"I see that John Kerry, the father of the now terminated Iran deal, is thinking of running for President. I should only be so lucky," Trump said.

Kerry, who was a 2004 presidential nominee, was asked about his interest in running in 2020. Although he told CBS's "Face the Nation," that talk of who would run for president is a "distraction," the Democrat didn't rule out the possibility.