Cramer Remix: A pullback in these stocks is a gift to investors

  • CNBC's Jim Cramer reveals the big opportunity behind the decline in medical device stocks.
  • The "Mad Money" host also sits down with the CEOs of Camping World Holdings and Bausch Health Companies.
  • In the lightning round, Cramer congratulates Salesforce's co-founder and CEO on his purchase of Time Magazine.

CNBC's Jim Cramer has realized that in this market, it doesn't really pay to be smart.

"Don't try to be clever: this is a market that rewards obvious thinking," the "Mad Money" host said after stocks closed down slightly on Monday. "While [it] may sound like the dumbest investment strategy imaginable – pure circular reasoning – it's also been incredibly profitable. And I think it's going to stay that way until the end of the year."

Cramer spotted a particularly attractive opportunity in shares of the medical device makers, when Boston Scientific, Becton Dickinson, Illumina, PerkinElmer, Abbott Laboratories, Medtronic, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Zimmer Biomet and Intuitive Surgical finally paused their respective rallies.

"These are sainted stocks. The fact that they pulled back today is a gift," he said. "When the secular growth winners pull back like they did today, you want to be a buyer, not a seller."

If you're worried about the trade war, look at China: Cramer

An investor watches the electronic board at a stock exchange hall on July 2, 2018 in Hangzhou, China. 
VCG | Visual China Group | Getty Images
An investor watches the electronic board at a stock exchange hall on July 2, 2018 in Hangzhou, China. 

Investors fretted on Monday about what would come of President Donald Trump's insistence on placing tariffs on another $200 billion worth of Chinese goods, but Cramer felt they were missing the big picture.

Yes, the president has reportedly been unsatisfied with the trade talks between the United States and China, and sure, his day-to-day hawkish proposals have not been well-received by Wall Street, Cramer acknowledged.

But to him, trying to gauge the actual impact of the tariffs meant looking at the overall market layout — specifically, comparing the U.S. market's performance with China's.

"Our economy may be doing just fine, and so's our stock market, but China? I see real problems and real worries," Cramer said Monday. "The Chinese stock market has fallen to its lowest level since November of 2014. In fact, it's now down 20 percent year to date, and I don't think it's found a bottom yet."

Find out what that could mean for investors by clicking here.

Marcus Lemonis on Camping World Holdings' long-term vision

Marcus Lemonis, CEO of Camping World.
Adam Jeffery | CNBC
Marcus Lemonis, CEO of Camping World.

Camping World Holdings Chairman and CEO Marcus Lemonis issued a vote of confidence in his RV and camping accessory retailer when he bought a chunk of its stock on Friday.

"I set up the bid and I ended up only with 25,000 shares. I was kind of disappointed," Lemonis, also host of CNBC's "The Profit," admitted to Cramer in an interview on Monday.

While shares of Camping World have been relatively stagnant since Lemonis last appeared on the show in June, the CEO appeared confident that his company would achieve its longer-term goals.

In particular, Lemonis said that Camping World's 2017 acquisition of outdoor products retailer Gander Mountain would help bolster the Good Sam program, which he said in the past makes his company "the category-killer" in its space.

To watch and read more about Lemonis' interview, click here.

Vans: The up-and-coming 'lifestyle brand'

Maria Joao wears vans trainers,  in Madrid, Spain.
Pablo Cuadra | Getty Images
Maria Joao wears vans trainers,  in Madrid, Spain.

From Lululemon to Nike, top-selling brands are no longer just making products for their customers. They're building entire brand identities around the products they sell — and it's working, Cramer said on Monday.

"In an increasingly fragmented society, lifestyle brands make you feel like you're part of something, maybe something larger than yourself," he said. "And people are willing to pay up for that sense of group identity."

Vans, a VF Corp. subsidiary that began as a skateboarders' shoe and apparel shop and has since become more mainstream, could be the next major lifestyle brand, Cramer said.

To find out why, click here.

Bausch Health Companies CEO Joe Papa on turnaround, R&D

Joe Papa
Chris Goodney | Bloomberg | Getty Images
Joe Papa

Bausch Health Companies is slowly but surely pulling itself out of the slump it entered when it was still known as Valeant Pharmaceuticals, the company's chairman and CEO, Joe Papa, told Cramer in a Monday interview.

"We're two years in to a multi-year plan, but importantly, in the last two quarters, we've shown organic growth for the first time since 2015," the CEO said, adding that "right now, we do not feel compelled to sell any [divisions], which puts us in a much stronger position."

Now, Bausch is focusing squarely on innovation, with research and development up 15 percent versus last year, Papa told Cramer.

That innovation is "all targeted towards bringing out new products" like advanced contact lenses and red-eye relief share-taker Lumify, the CEO said.

"We're really excited about what this means for our future and the excitement that we're starting to turn the company around."

To watch Papa's full interview, click here.

Lightning round: Congrats, Marc Benioff

In Cramer's lightning round, he zipped through his take on callers' favorite stocks:

Apptio: "To me, this is a worrisome situation because I've got cloud stocks that are going down and I want to buy the cloud kings when they go down. Salesforce is going down– I mean, congratulations, Marc and Lynne Benioff. Buying Time Magazine, I think, is good and it's totally separate from Salesforce. But Salesforce is going down. I'd rather see you in some high-quality stock like that."

Invitae: "I have looked at this company when I did the Biotech Bible for TheStreet.com and I felt that it was way too speculative. But you know what? This thing has just roared. But it's not mine. It's too speculative for me. As long as you understand that it is a spec, then you're OK."

Disclosure: Cramer's charitable trust owns shares of Abbott Laboratories and Salesforce.com.

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