Koch network standing by Brett Kavanaugh after sexual assault allegations 

  • The political network funded by billionaire industrialist Charles Koch is standing by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh following allegations of sexual assault.
  • Americans for Prosperity, a Koch-backed group, committed seven figures to supporting Kavanaugh just after he was nominated by President Donald Trump in July.
Charles Koch, head of Koch Industries.
Bo Rader | Wichita Eagle | Tribune News Service | Getty Images
Charles Koch, head of Koch Industries.

The political network funded by billionaire industrialist Charles Koch is standing by Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh following allegations of sexual assault.

A representative for the influential organization told CNBC in a statement that they are going to monitor the decisions being made by the Senate Judiciary Committee, who have yet to hold a vote to confirm Kavanaugh. Here is the full statement:

Any allegation of this type should be taken seriously, however, we are not going to speculate on media reports. Our support of Brett Kavanaugh's nomination is based on his impeccable qualifications, decades of experience, and his extensive record of defending the Constitution and the rule of law. He also received the American Bar Association's (ABA) highest rating, which included an analysis of his character and integrity. We will continue to follow the Judiciary Committee's lead as it evaluates the allegations.

Americans for Prosperity, a Koch-backed group, committed seven figures to supporting Kavanaugh just after he was nominated by PresidentDonald Trump in July.

According to their July press release, AFP decided to move ahead with advertising and grassroots engagement in the congressional midterm battleground states of West Virginia, North Dakota, Indiana, Florida, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin, among others.

Prior to Kavanaugh's nomination, the group were also asked to join a coalition of political advocacy groups that were expected to promote whoever the president chose as long as they matched with the network's principles. AFP previously put forward a six-figure investment in backing Neil Gorsuch, another Trump nominee to the Supreme Court.

Gorsuch was confirmed by the Senate in April 2017.

On Sunday, Christine Blasey Ford went public with a story to The Washington Post, alleging Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her while he was in high school at Georgetown Preparatory School. She said she was about 15 years old at the time; Kavanaugh would have been about 17.

While at a party, Ford says, Kavanaugh pinned her to a bed, groped over her clothes and tried to pull off her bathing suit. She goes on to say when she tried to scream, Kavanaugh covered her mouth.

"I thought he might inadvertently kill me," Ford told the Post. "He was trying to attack me and remove my clothing."

Kavanaugh has repeatedly denied the allegation and on Monday said he would be willing to testify in front of the Judiciary Committee to contest the charges.

"I am willing to talk to the Senate Judiciary Committee in any way the Committee deems appropriate to refute this false allegation, from 36 years ago, and defend my integrity," Kavanaugh said through a White House spokesman.

Ford's attorney, Debra Katz, has not returned multiple interview requests by CNBC.

The accusation against Kavanaugh has sent Capitol Hill into disarray, with a bipartisan coalition of lawmakers calling for a vote to be delayed until an investigation is complete.

One of the senators voicing concern has been Arizona Republican and Senate Judiciary Committee member Jeff Flake. He said recently that he wasn't comfortable voting yes until they heard more from Ford.

Maine Republican Sen.Susan Collins called on both Ford and Kavanaugh to testify under oath in a tweet on Monday.

All 10 Democrats on the committee signed a letter directed at their Republican committee chairman, Sen. Chuck Grassley, calling for any vote for Kavanaugh to be delayed until the Federal Bureau of Investigation follows up with their previous referral.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the Democratic leader on the committee, confirmed last week that she had forwarded a letter signed by Ford and alleging abuse by Kavanaugh to the FBI.

Still, Trump's allies are continuing to back Kavanaugh and questioning the timing of Ford moving ahead with her story.

In an interview with CNBC on Monday, Trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani questioned why Feinstein waited until now to send Ford's letter to the FBI after reportedly having possession of it since July.

"I got to believe Feinstein didn't make much of it at first and that this is a bit of a Hail Mary pass," Giuliani said.

He acknowledged, however, that because of the seriousness of the claims, it may be best for Kavanaugh and Ford to testify in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

"Maybe in fairness to everybody, you have to put everybody under oath," Giuliani said. "It doesn't have to be a hearing. It could just be a deposition."