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Trump claims Democrats are using 'false accusations' to attack Kavanaugh

Key Points
  • President Trump appears to abandon all pretense that he believes any part of the sexual assault allegations that two women have leveled against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.
  • "The Democrats are working hard to destroy a wonderful man ... with an array of False Acquisitions the likes of which have never been seen," Trump tweeted, subsequently replacing that post with one alleging "False Accusations."
  • The White House and Kavanaugh are waging a public relations war against Senate Democrats and, increasingly, against Kavanaugh's individual accusers.
President Donald Trump listens to a question during a bilateral meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-in on the sidelines of the 73rd United Nations General Assembly in New York, U.S., September 24, 2018.
Carlos Barria | Reuters

President Donald Trump on Monday appeared to abandon all pretense that he believes any part of the sexual assault allegations that two women have leveled against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

"The Democrats are working hard to destroy a wonderful man, and a man who has the potential to be one of our greatest Supreme Court Justices ever, with an array of False Acquisitions the likes of which have never been seen before!" Trump tweeted on Monday night, misspelling the word "accusations."

false acquisitions tweet 180924

Trump quickly followed this up with another tweet, writing, "REMEMBER THE MIDTERMS!" It is unclear exactly to whom the second tweet was directed. A little while later, Trump apparently deleted his earlier post and replaced it with one accusing Democrats instead of "False Accusations."

The accusations come from two women who accuse Kavanaugh of sexual misconduct when they were in high school or college.

California professor Christine Blasey Ford alleged that Kavanaugh held her down, covered her mouth and tried to undress her at a party when they were in high school in suburban Maryland.

A woman who was a classmate of Kavanaugh's at Yale, Deborah Ramirez, said he aggressively exposed himself to her at a party during their freshman year. Kavanaugh has denied both allegations.

Nonetheless, the allegations have derailed Kavanaugh's confirmation process, which had once appeared to be all but assured. Now, the White House and the nominee are engaged in a public relations battle with Senate Democrats and, increasingly, with Kavanaugh's individual accusers.

When the Ford allegation became public earlier this month, the White House and the president initially seesawed between defending Kavanaugh and trying to distance Trump and the Republican Party from the scandal engulfing the nominee.

By the end of last week, however, Trump had reportedly decided not to withdraw Kavanaugh's nomination and to instead come out swinging against the accusations and the accusers.

On Monday, Trump repeatedly praised Kavanaugh in between meetings at the United Nations General Assembly in New York.

Both Kavanaugh and Ford are scheduled to testify before the Senate on Thursday regarding her allegations.

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Retail

Walmart warns Trump's tariffs may force it to hike prices

Key Points
  • Walmart said that it may hike prices of products if the Trump administration imposes a tariff on Chinese imports.
  • The retailer warned about the price hikes in a letter the company wrote to U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer two weeks ago.
  • In its list of consumer products that could be affected by these tariffs, Walmart included gas grills, Christmas lights, and bicycles.