Shares of the small server company at the center of a China tech spying scandal shed 41%

  • Super Micro, with a market cap just over half a billion, suffered its worst trading day since its IPO in 2007.
  • The company is denying allegations from a Bloomberg report that it allowed microchips capable of spying on U.S. companies into servers bought by AWS and Apple.
  • AWS and Apple have also denied the report.
Visitors walking past stands, including the Super Micro booth, during the Computex Taipei 2014 expo in Taiwan, June 3, 2014. 
Chris Stowers | Bloomberg | Getty Images
Visitors walking past stands, including the Super Micro booth, during the Computex Taipei 2014 expo in Taiwan, June 3, 2014. 

Shares of Super Micro, the small server component manufacturer cited by Bloomberg as central to a spying scandal involving China, shed 41 percent Thursday.

Super Micro has denied the claims, as have Apple and AWS, who were cited in the report as having received rogue microchips capable of spying in equipment made for their data centers.

Super Micro, with a market cap just over half a billion, suffered its worst trading day since its IPO in 2007.

Trading of the small server company's common stock was suspended on the Nasdaq Aug. 23 after repeatedly missing SEC filing deadlines. Super Micro shares now trade on over-the-counter markets.

The report, citing numerous government officials, said the microchips allegedly found in Super Micro equipment have been under investigation for years. The allegations come as the Trump administration has repeatedly said trade with China has been hampered by the country's alleged cyberattacks and IP thefts against the U.S.