Cramer Remix: The future looks bright for this beaten-down cybersecurity stock

  • Shares of Symantec have fallen nearly 30 percent this year, but Jim Cramer thinks that it's worth taking a second look at the beaten-down stock after a $670 million investment from Starboard Value.
  • The "Mad Money" host also explains why he believes oil prices are on the verge of a slowdown.

Shares of cybersecurity firm Symantec have fallen nearly 30 percent this year, but CNBC's Jim Cramer thinks it's worth taking a second look at the beaten-down stock.

In August, hedge fund Starboard Value invested $670 million into Symantec and nominated five new board members. Starboard Value has "a really consistent long-term track record," the "Mad Money" host said Monday.

Starboard ended up appointing three board members, including Rick Hill, former CEO of Novellus.

Last week, Symantec reported quarterly earnings that beat Wall Street's estimates. With these strong financial results combined with Starboard Value's involvement, Cramer thinks "the stock will start getting more respect in the not too distant future."

Insider buying can signal a stock is about to pop

Ginni Rometty, CEO of IBM on Mad Money to discuss IBM's acquisition of Redhat. 
Adam Jeffery | CNBC
Ginni Rometty, CEO of IBM on Mad Money to discuss IBM's acquisition of Redhat. 

During volatile trading days with conflicting signals, investors need "some sort of totem that can help point us in the right direction," Cramer said.

On Monday, he suggested looking out for large insider buying.

While insiders sell for all kinds of reasons, they only buy for one reason: "to make money," Cramer said.

Five IBM board members recently bought shares in the company, including CEO Ginni Rometty who purchased over $3 million worth of stock. Rometty's purchase, her first on the open market, signals "a real commitment," Cramer said.

Read Cramer's guide to insider buying here.

Oil prices on the verge of a slowdown

Workers connect drill bits and drill collars, used to extract natural petroleum, on Endeavor Energy Resources LP's Big Dog Drilling Rig 22 in the Permian basin outside of Midland, Texas.
Brittany Sowacke | Bloomberg | Getty Images
Workers connect drill bits and drill collars, used to extract natural petroleum, on Endeavor Energy Resources LP's Big Dog Drilling Rig 22 in the Permian basin outside of Midland, Texas.

Oil prices may be taking a turn lower despite strong performances by major oil companies, according to Cramer.

Exxon Mobil, Chevron and BP all released their quarterly earnings numbers last week, reporting "some of the best quarters I can recall in the oil patch," he said.

Exxon and Chevron both reported their highest cash flows from operating activities in recent years. BP raised its stock dividend, and the CFO believes that oil will continue to trade above $70 for the next six months.

However, Cramer thinks that the major oil companies' rosy outlook doesn't reflect the economic reality.

Read Cramer's full take here.

The not-so-failing New York Times

Donald Trump views a photo of himself on the cover of The New York Times during an RNC goodbye reception at the Westin Hotel in Cleveland, on Friday, July 22, 2016.
Ty Wright | Bloomberg | Getty Images
Donald Trump views a photo of himself on the cover of The New York Times during an RNC goodbye reception at the Westin Hotel in Cleveland, on Friday, July 22, 2016.

Although President Donald Trump frequently derides The New York Times as "failing," his criticisms have given the newspaper a boost.

"This is one of those situations where all publicity is good publicity," Cramer said. "Every time Trump criticizes the Times, he's making it more relevant, and I think that translates directly into more subscriptions."

Last week, The New York Times reported quarterly earnings that beat Wall Street's expectations, driven by strong digital subscription growth. The stock is up more than 50 percent for the year.

The paper has bucked the downward trend in the print media industry by focusing on its online business.

Read more about how "The Gray Lady" has made a comeback here.

Cramer's off-road buy: Fox Factory

Vitpilen 701 street motorcycle, part of Husqvarna Motorcycles’ 2018 street bike line.
Source: Husqvarna Motorcycles
Vitpilen 701 street motorcycle, part of Husqvarna Motorcycles’ 2018 street bike line.

While Cramer admits he doesn't know much about motorcycles or ATVs, he was impressed by the financials of Fox Factory, which manufactures shock absorbers.

The company beat Wall Street's estimates on the top and bottom lines when it released its quarterly earnings report last week.

Fox Factory is also building a new manufacturing facility in Georgia. "That's not something you do if you're worried about a slowdown," Cramer said.

While Cramer wouldn't normally recommend companies in the auto parts industries, he believes that Fox Factory is an exception to the rule.

Click here to watch Cramer answer listeners' questions.

Lightning round: WWE is more than entertainment

In Cramer's lightning round, he gave his take on callers' favorite stocks at rapid speed:

WWE: "It's got a great subscription business. It's entertainment that [Take-Two Interactive Software CEO] Strauss Zelnick introduced us to that actually is a two-thumbs-up situation."

Nokia: "Can it go up? Yes, absolutely. Is it a bad stock? No. Is it the highest quality? No. And I do think you need high quality here."

Johnson Controls International: "JCI is not a great stock. I don't want you to own it. There's so many other industrials that are doing well, and their stocks are struggling. Let's stay away from that one."

Disclosure: Cramer's charitable trust owns shares of BP.

Questions for Cramer?
Call Cramer: 1-800-743-CNBC

Want to take a deep dive into Cramer's world? Hit him up!
Mad Money Twitter - Jim Cramer Twitter - Facebook - Instagram - Vine

Questions, comments, suggestions for the "Mad Money" website? madcap@cnbc.com

Cramer's New Book