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Election Day storms down power lines across Deep South 

Key Points
  • A line of storms moved through the Deep South overnight and early Tuesday morning, knocking down trees and power lines from Louisiana to South Carolina.
  • There were no serious injuries, but an estimated 11,000 residents were left without electricity.
  • The National Weather Service warned of a possibility of high winds, severe thunderstorms and possible tornadoes Tuesday around Baltimore, Washington, D.C., and the Mid-Atlantic region.
Voters line up in the rain outside Bright Family and Youth Center in the Columbia Heights neighborhood in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018. 
Pablo Martinez Monsivais | AP  

As polls opened across the country, residents of several states were contending with severe weather conditions that could affect voter turnout.

A line of storms moved through the Deep South overnight and early Tuesday morning, knocking down trees and power lines from Louisiana to South Carolina. There were no serious injuries, but an estimated 11,000 residents were left without electricity.

A separate storm front in central Tennessee killed one person, injured two others and left thousands without power.

The National Weather Service warned of a possibility of high winds, severe thunderstorms and possible tornadoes Tuesday around Baltimore, Washington, D.C., and the Mid-Atlantic region.

Dry weather was forecast for the West and Southwest, but significant snow accumulations were expected across the northern Rockies.

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Key Points
  • With voters along the Eastern Seaboard getting wet heading to the polls this Election Day, political scientists and meteorologists are attempting to game out whether the inclement weather could affect election results.
  • The weather has taken on unusual significance, because it can be a quiet determinant of voter behavior. Studies have shown that bad weather can depress turnout, particularly among groups likely to vote for Democrats.