EU's trade commissioner hopes European Union nations will support the new draft Brexit deal

  • If British Prime Minister Theresa May did indeed get the government in the U.K. with her, "that's certainly a positive development," Malmstrom says.
  • May told reporters late Wednesday she had won over her divided cabinet on a draft Brexit deal.
  • Asked if the EU would approve such a measure, Malmstrom says, "I certainly hope so."

European Union Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmstrom told CNBC on Wednesday she hopes that EU member states will support the new draft Brexit deal that U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May secured among her senior ministers.

More than two years after Britain voted in a referendum to leave the EU, May told reporters late Wednesday in London she had won over her divided cabinet.

"We are very sad that the Brits are leaving us," Malmstrom said in a "Closing Bell" interview. "If [May] got the government in the U.K. with her, that's certainly a positive development."

Asked if the EU would approve such a measure, Malmstrom said, "I certainly hope so."

Malmstrom said the EU welcomes a final Brexit agreement as soon as possible, so that both sides can then "start to think about the life after and our future relations."

"When the U.K. is leaving the European Union, they will have to leave all the trade agreements, that exist currently, and negotiate with new partners," Malmstrom said.

May hopes the draft deal, which was reached after a five-hour meeting, will satisfy both Brexit voters and EU supporters by ensuring close ties with the trading bloc after Britain leaves.

"I firmly believe that the draft withdrawal agreement was the best that could be negotiated," said May, an initial opponent of Brexit who won the top job in the turmoil following the June 2016 referendum.

"The choices before us were difficult," she added. "But the collective decision by [the] cabinet was that the government should agree [to] the draft withdrawal agreement and the outlying political declaration."

May, the weakest British leader in a generation, now faces the tough task of trying to push the deal through parliament, where opponents criticized the agreement, even before they read it.

"I know there will be difficult days ahead and this is a decision that will come under intense scrutiny, and that is entirely as it should be," May said.

— Reuters contributed to this report.