Health and Wellness

Dolly Parton gets up at 3 a.m. every day — here's her morning routine

Dolly Parton on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. 
NBCU
Dolly Parton on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. 

Iconic country music star Dolly Parton is 72, and she gets up at 3 a.m. every day.

"I get up early. … I'm usually up by 3 o'clock. I go to bed early, but I'm just an early bird." Parton told NBC's "The TODAY Show" on Friday.

"I get up, I do my little meditations, I do my little spiritual work," she said.

She also reviews work she has to do for the day.

"I do more work between 3 [a.m.] and 7 [a.m.] than most people do all day, because it's quiet and the energy's all low, except mine. So I just really get a lot done.

"I just love the wee hours, I call it," Parton said.

Indeed, the septuagenarian singer-songwriter — who has already been awarded the Living Legend medal by the Library of Congress — is still producing new work.

She is the only woman on Forbes' 2018 list of top-earning country music stars, with earnings of $19 million. In addition to making music, Parton owns Dollywood-themed destinations (including a theme park, a resort, a water park and a collection of mountain cabins) and other entertainment attractions.

She was on "The TODAY Show" to talk about her new album, Dumplin', released Nov. 30. It is the soundtrack for the Netflix movie (by the same name) starring Jennifer Aniston.

To be sure, Parton is not the only ultra-successful person who gets up early.

Apple CEO Tim Cook gets up at 3:45 a.m. "Yes, every morning," he told Time. Cook responds to emails and goes to the gym before getting to work.

Cook bragged on Twitter of sleeping in "'til 4:30" one morning ahead of an event at Apple.

While getting up early may be a productivity hack for the likes of Parton and Cook, sleep is important too.

In August, Tesla CEO Elon Musk revealed he was working 120 hours a week. Entrepreneur, author and sleep advocate Arianna Huffington wrote an open letter to the entrepreneur, telling him to spend more time resting.

"Working 120-hour weeks doesn't leverage your unique qualities, it wastes them. You can't simply power through — that's just not how our bodies and our brains work," Huffington wrote.

As for Parton, gratitude and prayer bookend her day.

The last thing she does before bed: "I pray," Parton told "The TODAY Show."

"And that's the first thing I do when I get up, I just thank the lord for another day," she says.

Disclosure: NBC and CNBC are divisions of NBCUniversal.

See also:

Elon Musk: 'You're gonna go a little bonkers if you work 120 hours a week'

What Warren Buffett taught Bill Gates about managing time by sharing his (nearly) blank calendar

This former Google X exec reverse engineered happiness — here's what he found