UK opposition leader tables no-confidence vote against Theresa May's government

  • Speaking after the announcement of the results, Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the Labour party, said the result was a "catastrophic defeat" for the government.
  • Corbyn further announced that the no-confidence motion will be debated in the House of Commons on Wednesday with a vote reportedly due at around 7 p.m. local time.
Prime Minister Theresa May and opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn during the State Opening of Parliament on June 21, 2017 in London, United Kingdom.
Stefan Wermuth | WPA Pool | Getty Image
Prime Minister Theresa May and opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn during the State Opening of Parliament on June 21, 2017 in London, United Kingdom.

The U.K. opposition leader has tabled a motion of no-confidence in the government following the defeat of Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit deal.

Speaking after the announcement of the results, Jeremy Corbyn, the leader of the Labour party, said the result was a "catastrophic defeat" for the government.

Corbyn further announced that the no-confidence motion will be debated in the House of Commons on Wednesday with a vote reportedly due at around 7 p.m. local time.

May overwhelmingly lost a crucial vote on her Brexit plans in the U.K.'s lower house of parliament on Tuesday evening.

May lost by 230 votes after lawmakers voted by 432 to 202 to reject the deal. Politicians from different political parties rejected the proposed Withdrawal Agreement, currently the only deal agreed with the European Union on how Britain should exit the bloc in March of this year.

Should a majority of lawmakers from across all the U.K. political parties express "no confidence in Her Majesty's government," then the current Parliament would have 14 days to agree a new arrangement that would govern the country.

If that isn't possible, then a General Election is likely. The EU has said that a change in U.K. leadership would not change its stance.

It essentially means that May is fighting for her job, but it's far from certain that she will lose the vote. The Northern Irish party propping up May's minority government, called the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), said it would back the British prime minister, according to a spokesman.

However, Ian Blackford, the leader of the Scottish National Party — which is the third largest party in the parliament — confirmed that it would support Labour's motion.

CNBC's David Reid contributed to this article.