Top Stories
Top Stories
Entertainment

Attention cord cutters: Netflix has more 'certified fresh' movies than Amazon, Hulu and HBO combined

Key Points
  • Netflix has the highest concentration of Rotten Tomatoes "certified fresh" films in its library compared to Hulu, HBO and Amazon Prime.
  • Rotten Tomatoes "certified fresh" rating has become a benchmark for movies over the last two decades.
  • Amazon Prime has the largest number of titles, with more than 17,000 films in its lexicon.
Streaming player menu screen featuring Netflix, Amazon, Vudu, Hulu, and Redbox Instant.
Getty Images

More doesn't always mean better, especially when it comes to streaming services.

As more people cut the cord and sign-up for non-traditional cable options, companies like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime have to make their offerings more enticing to consumers.

While many customers have subscriptions with multiple services, these streaming platforms still have to remain competitive. Some customers want a wide selection of content to choose from, others are looking for the newest titles or programs that are exclusive to just one platform.

For others, it's all about prestige. Using data from Rotten Tomatoes, ReelGood and JustWatch, the folks at StreamingObserver, an organization that analyzes the latest trends in streaming technology, determined that Netflix had the highest concentration of Rotten Tomatoes "certified fresh" films in its library when compared to its competitors.

In fact, the platform had more quality films than Hulu, Amazon and HBO combined.

Rotten Tomatoes' "certified fresh" rating has become a benchmark for movies over the last two decades. The website is often consulted by moviegoers before they decide to go see a film. Rotten Tomatoes aggregates reviews from major publications and reputable blogs and determines what percentage of those reviews were positive versus negative.

If at least 60 percent of a film's reviews are positive, it will receive a red tomato. If it is less than 60 percent, it is given a green splat. In order to be considered "certified fresh" at least 75 percent of a movie's reviews must be positive.

Nearly 16 percent of all Netflix's 3,800 films are "certified fresh" compared to only 1.3 percent of Amazon's more than 17,000 titles.

"While many contend that quality is the most important attribute, that's not to say size doesn't matter at all," Chris Branter, industry expert at StreamingObserver, said in the report. "In order to keep subscribers happy, streaming services do need to have a large, diverse library that's regularly updated so everyone has plenty of options to choose from."

As more players get into the streaming space, companies will have to continue to differentiate themselves from one another. Especially, when one of those new entries is Disney. The House of Mouse is expected to launch Disney+ in late 2019 and feature a slate of shows and films from beloved franchises like "Star Wars" and "Marvel" that can only be seen on its platform.