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Haagen-Dazs announces new boozy ice cream line

Key Points
  • Haagen-Dazs is releasing a line of alcohol-infused ice cream treats.
  • The boozy flavors will be available in grocery stores in April and in select Haagen-Dazs locations in March.
  • Each product contains less than 0.5 percent alcohol per volume.
The Spirits Collection by Haagen-Dazs
Source: Haagen-Dazs

Haagen-Dazs just announced a new line of seven alcohol-infused ice cream treats.

The collection includes five new flavors of ice cream: Irish Cream Brownie, Rum Tres Leches, Bourbon Vanilla Bean Truffle, Stout Chocolate Pretzel Crunch and Bourbon Praline Pecan. It also includes a cookie treat, Irish Cream Cookie Squares, and a nondairy option, Amaretto Black Cherry Almond Toffee. Each product contains less than 0.5 percent alcohol per volume.

The brand, produced in the U.S. by Nestle subsidiary Dreyer's, plans to roll out the line in grocery stores nationwide in April. Fans eager to taste the boozy ice cream can try it in select Haagen-Dazs stores beginning in March. The collection has been available for more than a year and a half in Canada.

Federal law does not consider any beverage that contains less than 0.5 percent alcohol by volume to be alcoholic. But laws regulating alcohol in food can vary state by state. In New York, for example, buyers of any age can legally purchase the boozy ice cream. It is unclear if the collection will be available in grocery stores across all 50 states because of differing alcohol regulations across state lines. Haagen-Dazs did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The ice cream brand isn't the first to add alcohol to its products. Ben & Jerry's launched a flavor infused with bourbon in 2017, but the alcohol cooked off during the baking process. Smaller brands such as Tipsy Scoop have been selling alcoholic ice cream for years.

Correction: Federal law does not consider any beverage that contains less than 0.5 percent alcohol by volume to be alcoholic. An earlier version misstated the law.

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