Autos

Honda to recall about 1 million vehicles in US to replace defective Takata airbags

Key Points
  • Free repairs of the recalled cars would begin immediately in the United States with replacement parts made by alternate suppliers, Honda said.
  • Honda became aware of the issue after a Honda Odyssey crash, where the front airbag deployed and injured the driver's arm.
Employees perform quality control inspections on Honda Accord vehicles at the Honda of America Manufacturing Marysville Auto Plant in Marysville, Ohio, on Dec. 21, 2017.
Ty Wright | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Honda said on Tuesday it would recall about 1.1 million Honda and Acura vehicles in the United States to replace defective Takata airbags on the driver's side.

The company said here it was aware of one injury linked to the defect that may have caused the airbag to rupture when it was deployed in a crash.

The vehicles involved in the recall were previously repaired using specific Takata desiccated replacement inflators (PSDI-5D) or entire replacement airbag modules containing these inflators.

Free repairs of the recalled cars would begin immediately in the United States with replacement parts made by alternate suppliers, Honda said.

Honda became aware of the issue after a Honda Odyssey crash, where the front airbag deployed and injured the driver's arm.

An investigation later showed that manufacturing issues at Takata's Mexico facility introduced excessive moisture into the inflator during assembly, leading to the problem.

The total number of recalled inflators is now about 21 million in about 12.9 million Honda and Acura vehicles that have been subject to recall for replacing Takata front airbag inflators in the United States, the company said.

Automakers in the United States repaired more than 7.2 million defective Takata air bag inflators in 2018, as companies have ramped up efforts to track down parts in need of replacement.

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Key Points
  • U.K. aviation regulators are the latest to ground Boeing 737 Max jets following the second deadly crash of one of the popular planes in less than five months.
  • The measures follow the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8 on Sunday.
  • The FAA says it does not see a reason to ground the planes and that Boeing plans software fixes.