Money

Inside the Connecticut mansion 50 Cent just sold for $2.9 million

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Inside the $2.9 million mansion 50 Cent just sold

Rapper Curtis James Jackson III — famously known as 50 Cent — finally sold his sprawling Connecticut estate for $2.9 million. Located in Farmington, about 80 miles from Greenwich, the home has over 50,000 square feet of living space and is one of the few in the state with approved grounds for landing a helicopter, according to its listing agency Douglas Elliman.

The mansion, describe in the listing as the essence of "opulence and luxury" — includes a 19 bedrooms, 25 bathrooms and an indoor pool.

Douglas Elliman
Douglas Elliman
Douglas Elliman
Douglas Elliman
Douglas Elliman

In addition, the property boasts a night club space, an indoor basketball court, multiple game rooms, a green screen room, a recording studio, a full gym, a conference room and a home theater.

Douglas Elliman
Douglas Elliman
Douglas Elliman

Sitting on 17.6 acres, the grounds of the mansion include a pool, grotto, pond, basketball court, guesthouses and gardens. The home is located in Jennifer Leahy of Douglas Elliman brokered the sale of the mansion.

Douglas Elliman
Douglas Elliman

The property has not been an easy sell. 50 Cent has been hustling for years to find a buyer for the compound. Its selling price is 84 percent less than its first asking price 12 years ago, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Before it sold, it was listed on Zillow as being available for rent for $100,000 month.

A spokeswoman for 50 Cent told the Wall Street Journal the proceeds of the sale of the house would be donated to the rapper's no-profit, the G-Unity Foundation.

50 Cent reportedly purchased the property from boxing star Mike Tyson in 2003 for $4.1 million.

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