College

Actress Lori Loughlin, husband hit with new charges in college admissions scheme

Key Points
  • The parents are charged with money laundering in a second, superseding indictment.
  • They were already facing charges of conspiring to commit fraud, as of their arrests last month.
  • This comes just one day after actress Felicity Huffman and 12 other parents agreed to plead guilty.
In this April 3, 2019 file photo, actress Lori Loughlin, front, and husband, clothing designer Mossimo Giannulli, left, depart federal court in Boston after facing charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal.
Steven Senne | AP

Actress Lori Loughlin and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, are among 16 parents facing new federal charges in the largest college admissions scam in U.S. history.

The parents were charged with money laundering in a second, superseding indictment on Tuesday. They were already facing charges of conspiring to commit fraud, as of their arrests last month. An arraignment date has not yet been scheduled.

Loughlin and Giannulli are among 33 prominent parents originally accused of conspiring with William Singer and others in a scheme that involved rigging college entrance exams and bribing coaches at elite universities.

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The second indictment charges parents with "conspiring to launder the bribes and other payments in furtherance of the fraud by funneling them through Singer's purported charity and his for-profit corporation, as well as by transferring money into the United States, from outside the United States, for the purpose of promoting the fraud scheme."

Other parents indicted on the new charge Tuesday include Michelle Janavs, whose family developed the microwave snack line Hot Pockets before selling their company, and William McGlashan, who co-founded an investment fund with U2′s Bono in 2017, according to the Associated Press.

This comes just one day after actress Felicity Huffman and 12 other parents agreed to plead guilty. The fraud conspiracy scheme dates back to around 2011, documents show.

"My daughter knew absolutely nothing about my actions, and in my misguided and profoundly wrong way, I have betrayed her. This transgression toward her and the public I will carry for the rest of my life. My desire to help my daughter is no excuse to break the law or engage in dishonesty," Huffman said after her plea deal was announced.

— The Associated Press contributed to this report.