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This $500,000-a-month apartment is the most expensive rental listing in NYC — take a look inside

For $500,000, you can purchase a two-bedroom home in Borough Park, Brooklyn, go to space with a friend (one day) or buy a tiny private island.

Or you could pay one month's rent on residential apartment 39 at The Pierre New York hotel on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan — otherwise known as the most expensive listed apartment in New York City, according to The Corcoran Group.

That means a year-long lease will set you back $6 million.

So what do you get for $500,000 a month? Take a look inside.

Donna Dotan, courtesy The Corcoran Group

The 4,786-square-foot, furnished rental has six bedrooms and six and a half bathrooms. It takes up the hotel's entire 39th floor (out of 41) and comes with its own private elevator.

Donna Dotan, courtesy The Corcoran Group

There are 360-degree views of the city and Central Park, which is across the street.

View from the apartment's living space
Donna Dotan, courtesy The Corcoran Group
View from the apartment's living space
Donna Dotan, courtesy The Corcoran Group

The listing highlights the home's "pre-war details" and high-end decor, like Murano glass chandeliers.

Donna Dotan, courtesy The Corcoran Group

The master bedroom's en-suite marble bathroom has a large tub and a rain shower.

Donna Dotan, courtesy The Corcoran Group
Donna Dotan, courtesy The Corcoran Group

The rental comes with concierge service and twice-daily housekeeping, as well as access to the hotel fitness center and business center and a chauffeur-driven Jaguar XJL (based on availability).

Unit 39 is part of a collection of 15 furnished residences inside the hotel that range from $18,000 to $500,000 per month, which are available for short- or long-term leases, according to the listing.

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