Politics

House Judiciary Chair Jerrold Nadler calls special counsel Robert Mueller to testify by May 23 after Attorney General William Barr's news conference

Key Points
  • House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., called on special counsel Robert Mueller to testify before his committee "no later than May 23."
  • "As I have already communicated to the Department of Justice, I request your testimony before the Judiciary committee as soon as possible," Nadler wrote to Mueller.
  • The letter to Mueller was made public on Nadler's Twitter account minutes after Attorney General William Barr said Thursday that the nearly two-year Russia probe found "no collusion."
House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY) speaks during a news conference on April 9, 2019 in Washington, DC.
Zach Gibson | Getty Images

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., called on special counsel Robert Mueller to testify before his committee "no later than May 23."

The letter to Mueller was made public on Nadler's Twitter account minutes after Attorney General William Barr said Thursday that the nearly two-year Russia probe found "no collusion" between President Donald Trump's 2016 campaign and the Kremlin.

"As I have already communicated to the Department of Justice, I request your testimony before the Judiciary committee as soon as possible," Nadler wrote to Mueller. "But, in any event, no later than May 23, 2019. I look forward to working with you on a mutually agreeable date."

"We cannot take Attorney General Barr's word for it. We must read the full Mueller report, and the underlying evidence," he later tweeted.

Barr told reporters Thursday that he has "no objection to Bob Mueller personally testifying."

The report had not been made public when Barr spoke at the Department of Justice. Mueller was not present at the event.

"The bottom line," Barr said, was that "after nearly two years of investigation, thousands of subpoenas, and hundreds of warrants and witness interviews, the Special Counsel confirmed that the Russian government sponsored efforts to illegally interfere with the 2016 presidential election but did not find that the Trump campaign or other Americans colluded in those schemes."

Nadler's committee, which holds authority to launch an impeachment inquiry against Trump, demanded that Barr release the entire Mueller report and its underlying evidence without redactions. His committee authorized a subpoena for such a report in early April.

Barr said that a version "with all redactions removed except those relating to grand-jury information" will later be made available for some members of Congress. The report was released later Thursday

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer also called for Mueller to testify in the House and Senate in order to "restore public trust in the handling of the Special Council's Investigation."

— CNBC's Nadine El-Bawab contributed reporting.