College

Two parents plead guilty and are cooperating with investigators in college admissions scandal

Key Points
  • Two parents plead guilty in federal court in the Operation Varsity Blues college admissions scandal.
  • Bruce and Davina Isackson are the first parents to plead guilty and have agreed to cooperate with investigators.
  • They were accused of paying up to $600,000 to help their two daughters get into UCLA and the University of Southern California.
  • The two are scheduled for sentencing on July 31.
Bruce Isackson, center, leaves the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. scores.
Jonathan Wiggs | Boston Globe | Getty Images

A California couple accused of paying up to $600,000 to help get their daughters accepted into college pleaded guilty Wednesday in the Operation Varsity Blues college admissions scandal.

Bruce and Davina Isackson are the first parents to plead guilty and have agreed to cooperate with investigators. The two are among the 14 parents who agreed to plead guilty last month in the largest college admissions scheme in U.S. history.

The couple, from Hillsborough, California, pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud. Bruce Isackson also pleaded guilty to one count of money laundering conspiracy to defraud the IRS for claiming the payments were for tax deductible contributions to charity.

The Isacksons were accused of paying William "Rick" Singer a series of payments to help their daughters gain acceptance to UCLA and the University of Southern California, according to the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Massachusetts. Singer pleaded guilty in March.

The Isacksons could face 20 years in prison for the charge of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud. Sentencing is scheduled for July 31.

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Key Points
  • Booker's so-called baby bonds proposal, which has quickly become a centerpiece of his campaign, would provide every child born in the U.S. with a $1,000 savings account. For many people, more money would be added each year.
  • A recent analysis found the median wealth among young black Americans would swell to $57,845 from $2,900.
  • Young white Americans would see their net worth rise, as well, to $79,159 from $46,000.