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Mueller prosecutor Andrew Weissmann gets Trump Russia probe book deal: New York Times

Key Points
  • Andrew Weissmann, a leading prosecutor on special counsel Robert Mueller's team, has a deal with Random House to write a book about his work, The New York Times reports.
  • Weissmann was heavily involved in the criminal case against President Donald Trump's campaign manager Paul Manafort.
  • Mueller's probe examined Russian interference in the 2016 election, possible collusion by members of Trump's campaign with Russian agents, and possible obstruction of justice by the president himself.
Asst. U.S. Attorney Andy Weissmann speaks outside the Federal Court House after bringing charges against former Enron CFO Andrew Fastow October 2, 2002 in Houston, Texas.
Paul S Howell | Getty Images

Andrew Weissmann, a leading prosecutor on special counsel Robert Mueller's team, has made a deal to write a book about his work, which included the criminal case against President Donald Trump's campaign manager, according to a new report Friday.

Weissmann's book was acquired by publisher Random House, The New York Times reported. It is believed to be the first time a Mueller prosecutor has obtained a publishing deal related to the investigation.

Random House did not immediately respond to a request for comment from CNBC.

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Paul Manafort pleading guilty to two criminal counts

Weissmann was heavily involved in the prosecution of Paul Manafort, the longtime Republican operative who led Trump's presidential campaign for several months in 2016.

Manafort is serving a 7 1/2-year prison sentence for conspiracy and financial crimes.

Weissmann in April returned to New York University Law School, where he is a distinguished senior fellow. CNBC has reached out to an NYU spokesman, seeking comment from Weissmann.

Mueller's probe examined Russian interference in the 2016 election, possible collusion by members of Trump's campaign with Russian agents, and possible obstruction of justice by the president himself.

Mueller concluded that Russian agents did meddle in the election, but he did not find there was enough evidence to show that there was a criminal conspiracy with Trump campaign officials.

The special counsel declined in his final report to determine whether there was sufficient evidence to state whether Trump obstructed justice. But the report noted that investigators "found multiple acts by the President that were capable of exerting undue influence over law enforcement investigations, including the Russian-interference and obstruction investigations."

Mueller, during his only public statement on the probe, last month said, "If we had had confidence that the president clearly did not commit a crime, we would have said so."