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Motorcycles, batteries and rifles: Here's a list of products that still face September tariffs

Key Points
  • The United States Trade Representative says some planned tariffs will be delayed or removed.
  • Cellphones, some portable computers, and kitchenware won't face tariffs until December.
  • Motorcycles, batteries and firearms will be hit with tariffs in September. 
U.S. President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping at the G20 leaders summit in Japan on June 29, 2019.
Kevin Lamarque | Reuters

The United States Trade Representative released the updated lists of items facing new tariffs, with products such as motorcycles and firearms still slated to get hit in September.

The USTR office announced on Tuesday that some goods scheduled to face a new 10% tariff next month would see those tariffs delayed or removed completely.

Tariffs for items such as motorcycles, lithium-ion batteries, and certain categories of sporting goods, firearms and musical instruments will still take effect on Sept. 1.

Certain Apple products, such as AirPods, Apple Watch and HomePod, will also face tariffs starting Sept. 1.

Items on a list of delayed tariffs include cellphones, some portable computers, tableware, kitchenware and apparel such as sports footwear. Those tariffs were delayed until Dec. 15.

The imports facing tariffs starting in September were worth $108.8 billion from July of last year through the end of June, according to an analysis from Panjiva, part of S&P Global Market Intelligence. The list facing delayed tariffs was valued at $154.8 billion by the same measure.

The list of items where the proposed tariffs were removed has not been released.

The delays do not always apply broadly within consumer categories. For example, the tariffs on tennis rackets are delayed, but the ones on lacrosse sticks are not.

Read the full list facing tariffs in September.

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Key Points
  • Max Baucus, former U.S. ambassador to China, warns Beijing may be able to endure more hardship than Washington in their yearlong trade war.
  • "The Chinese are so tough, they can withstand more pain, in my judgement, than can Americans," says the ex-senator from Montana.
  • "The Chinese respect strength more than any other people. I think they can smell weakness better than any other people," Baucus explains.