Everything Jim Cramer said about the stock market on 'Mad Money,' including Nike earnings, Twilio CEO, Whirlpool's prospects, Twitter got away

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Cramer Remix: Whirlpool's charts says the stock has more room to run
  • CNBC's Jim Cramer examines Nike's earnings and explains how the iconic apparel brand managed to deliver results in the face of tariffs.
  • The "Mad Money" host sits down with the CEOs of messaging service provider Twilio and privately-held Apeel Sciences to get a read on their companies.
  • Disney and Salesforce passed up on acquiring Twitter in 2016. Cramer explains why he thinks that was a mistake for both firms.

Nike delivers on earnings while facing pressure from U.S.-China trade war

A pedestrian walks past an advertisement for Nike in Mumbai, India.
Dhiraj Singh | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Shares of Nike managed to set a record high despite trade headwinds because the company is in control of its fate, CNBC's said Wednesday.

"Thanks to the trade war, we know that, in theory, this should be the worst possible moment to sell iconic American brands into the People's Republic," the "Mad Money" host said.

The comments came after the sports apparel company's stock broke through the $90 mark after delivering top- and bottom-line beats in its fiscal first quarter report. Nike was implicated in tariffs on Chinese goods as it both makes and sells items into the country.

"Last night the company reported and we learned that, rather than being the most vulnerable to the trade war, Nike's actually the most in control of its own destiny," Cramer continued. "That's why the stock rallied $3 and change today."

Twilio CEO: Shorter-term losses doesn't distract us from longer-term goals

Jeff Lawson, CEO, Twilio
Scott Mlyn | CNBC

Cloud-based stocks have fallen hard in recent months, but messaging platform Twilio is riding a trend executives say will work in any economic condition.

"When times are good, when times are bad, every company needs to focus on growing their business, making their customers happy and making their customers repeat customers and loyal customers, and that's the business that we're in," CEO Jeff Lawson told Cramer. "We just focus on the long term."

Big gains in store for Whirlpool?

Whirlpool washing machines for sale at the Airport Home Appliance store in Concord, California.
David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Investors should be on the lookout for equities that have been able to maintain form as the rest of the market has stumbled, Cramer said.

One example is home appliance manufacturer Whirlpool, whose shares have pulled back just slightly, despite getting issued a downgrade in recent weeks. The host perused over chart analysis from his RealMoney.com colleague Tim Collins, who determined that the stock could have as much as 10% upside the rest of the year.

"Whirlpool recently got hit with a downgrade, and the stock barely blinked. I like that," Cramer said. "Now the charts, as interpreted by Tim Collins, suggest it could have a lot more room to run, and I think you could do a heck of a lot worse than owning this No. 1 appliance maker that has a greater-than 3% yield."

Apeel Sciences CEO: Preserving produce and reducing food waste

James Rogers, CEO, Apeel Sciences
Scott Mlyn | CNBC

Apeel Sciences is trying to save your fruit, save grocery stores money and, ultimately, do its part to save the planet.

That is, at least, the message that CEO and co-founder James Rogers laid out to Cramer Wednesday.

"We use food to preserve food," Rogers said in a "Mad Money" interview. "What Kroger gets out of this is when someone walks into one of their stores, they're able to pick up an Apeel avocado and get something that is going to be better for them, better for their family and better for the planet."

-Reporting by Kevin Stankiewicz

Twitter is the one that got away from Disney and Salesforce

CEO of The Walt Disney Company Robert Iger is seen September 23, 2019 in New York City.
Raymond Hall | GC Images | Getty Images

Disney CEO Bob Iger told Cramer in a recent "I got cold feet for the right reasons" when presented the chance to buy Twitter in 2016.

Salesforce.com's Marc Benioff was another chief executive, among other tech companies, that ultimately turned down acquiring the social media site when it was in the market for a takeover.

Cramer, however, thinks both leaders made a mistake.

"I think they both botched this one. ... Acquiring Twitter would've been a huge win for either of them, and not just because the stock subsequently caught fire," the host said. "I have enormous respect for Bob Iger and for Marc Benioff, but they shouldn't be talking about how Twitter as if it was a bullet that they dodged, in reality, it's the one that got away."

Cramer's lightning round

In Cramer's lightning round, the "Mad Money" host zips through caller questions about their favorite stock picks in rapid speed.

Dollar Tree: "I think it's a buy."

Halliburton: "We are not buying any oil or oil service stocks. I'm not putting you in the" house of pain.

Shake Shack: "Let it come down. It's been too hot since they reported that last good quarter. This stock has some room to come down, and then you can make your move."

Disclosure: Cramer's charitable trust owns shares of Disney, Salesforce and Twilio.

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