Weather & Natural Disasters

Tornado ravages north Dallas, leaving thousands without power

Key Points
  • A tornado plowed through parts of northern Dallas late on Sunday, knocking out power to more than 175,000 homes and businesses and delaying flights at regional airports.
  • All tornado warnings have been lifted and there are no flash flood warnings.
  • Emergency responders and the Dallas Morning News newspaper said no injuries or deaths had immediately been reported.
VIDEO1:0101:01
Tornado rips through Dallas, Texas, leaving severe damage in its wake

A tornado plowed through parts of northern Dallas late on Sunday, knocking out power to more than 175,000 homes and businesses and delaying flights at regional airports, officials said.

The storm left a miles-long swath of destruction through Dallas, hitting near the Love Field airport in the city's north, the National Weather Service's (NWS) Weather Prediction Center in College Park Maryland said early on Monday.

All tornado warnings have been lifted and there are no flash flood warnings, it added.

Emergency responders and the Dallas Morning News newspaper said no injuries or deaths had immediately been reported, but police and firefighters were going door-to-door in some neighborhoods to check on residents.

"It was exactly one tornado that hit at 9:02 p.m.," said David Roth, adding that it was a powerful one but crews need to survey the damage by daylight to assess its strength.

In this Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019 photo, Henry Ramirez, a member of Primera Iglesia Dallas, is consoled by his mother Maribel Morales as they survey severe damage to the church, where Ramirez plays drums and Morales attends, after a tornado tore through North

"We also saw golfball- and baseball-sized hail in some areas and a narrow swath of north Dallas that got between 1 to 3 inches of rain," Roth said, or the equivalent of 2.5 cm to 7.6 cm.

On Twitter, DFW Airport said its ramps were closed as a safety measure and departures were delayed at least until 12:30 a.m. CDT.

Next Article
Pharmaceuticals

Four drug companies reach a last-minute $260 million opioid settlement with two Ohio counties

Key Points
  • Four drug companies reached a last-minute legal settlement over their role in the opioid addiction epidemic, just as a nine-week trial was scheduled to start in Cleveland.
  • Drug distributors AmerisourceBergen, Cardinal Health and McKesson and drugmaker Teva Pharmaceutical fell short of a wider deal worth tens of billions of dollars to end all opioid litigation against them. 
  • A new trial date will be arranged for the fifth defendant, pharmacy chain operator Walgreens Boots Alliance.