Tech

Disney is 'not fixated' on lower price of Apple's streaming service, CEO Bob Iger says

Key Points
  • Disney is not too concerned about the lower price of competing streaming services, CEO Bob Iger tells CNBC. 
  • "We're very, very different than any other service that is out there," Iger says. 
  • "So while we view the others as competition, we're not fixated on the competitive side of things here," Iger explains. 
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Disney CEO Bob Iger say he's 'not worried' about competitors' streaming prices

Disney is not too concerned about the price of streaming services from Apple and other competitors, CEO Bob Iger told CNBC on Tuesday.

"We're not really worried about competition in terms of pricing because we have such a unique product," Iger said on "The Exchange."

"We're very, very different than any other service that is out there," Iger added, ticking off a litany of the content Disney+ will offer when it launches Nov. 12.

Those offerings "in one service, on one app" include new and existing TV shows and movies from Disney, Marvel, Pixar, Star Wars, National Geographic and The Simpsons, Iger said.

Disney+ will cost $6.99 per month. Apple TV+, which will only have a handful of shows on its Nov. 1 launch, will cost $4.99 per month. Apple is offering a free year of Apple TV+ to customers who buy a Mac, iPhone or Apple TV.

Netflix raised its prices earlier this year, putting its most popular HD streaming plan at $12.99, up from $10.99.

In the coming months, Peacock from NBCUniversal and HBO Max from AT&T's WarnerMedia will come online, adding further competition to the crowded streaming landscape.

"So while we view the others as competition, we're not fixated on the competitive side of things here," said Iger, who left Apple's board in September, the day after the tech giant announced the price and release date of its streaming service.

Iger's comments on Tuesday came hours after Verizon announced that it will offer its customers a year of Disney+ for free.

In a market now chock full of streaming services for consumers to choose from, it's an important development as it gives Disney millions of early subscribers who may continue to subscribe after the offer expires.

Iger said the move with Verizon is a "wholesale deal," so "we will get paid for that."

"They will also support us with a lot of marketing," Iger said, adding, "It will, I think, have a significant effect — not think, I know — in terms of jump-starting subscriptions."

Disclosure: NBCUniversal is the parent company of NBC and CNBC.

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Disney CEO Bob Iger on Disney+ deal with Verizon and the future of the industry