Here are Thursday's biggest analyst calls of the day: Nvidia, Tesla, Amazon & more

Key Points
  • Morgan Stanley downgraded Tesla to underweight from equal weight.
  • Stephens downgraded Tyson Foods to equal weight from overweight.
  • Morgan Stanley raised its price target on Amazon to $2,200 from $2,100.
  • Deutsche Bank raised its price target on Western Digital to $80 from $65.
  • Barclays raised its price target on Nvidia to $260 from $225.
  • Barclays raised its price target on Advanced Micro Devices to $50 from $32.
  • Mizuho raised its price target on Western Digital to $75 from $64.
  • Mizuho raised its price target on Nvidia to $270 from $230.
  • Morgan Stanley downgraded Charter to equal weight from overweight.
Tyson Chicken
Andrew Harrer | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Here are the biggest calls on Wall Street on Thursday:

Morgan Stanley downgraded Tesla to 'underweight' from 'equal weight'

Morgan Stanley downgraded the stock and said investors should wait for a better entry point.

"In our opinion, four factors have driven TSLA's share price up ~105% over the last four months: (1) stronger than expected global demand for Tesla vehicles, which has created more optimism around the long-term margin profile of the business; (2) China announcements that show Tesla's expansion into the world's largest electric vehicle (EV) market is progressing well from a demand and margin perspective; (3) supportive incentive developments (i.e. the potential, however small, for extended subsidies in the US); and (4) positive sentiment around product expansion."

Read more about this call here.

Stephens downgraded Tyson Foods to 'equal weight' from 'overweight'

Stephens downgraded Tyson Foods on valuation among other things.

"Given the unprecedented nature of African Swine Fever, it's possible that exports deliver the demand required to balance the protein market, and potentially a constructive environment in 2020, but with the valuation expansion we've seen, we think the stocks are more appropriately valued with balanced risk/reward. We would revisit our stance if we see more attractive valuation and/or better visibility into improving domestic supply/demand balance."