Davos WEF

'We have never served one gram of caviar': Meet the man feeding the Davos elite

Key Points
  • One of this week's lunch menus, served to representatives from companies such as BP, Goldman Sachs and Facebook includes pumpkin soup, broccoli mousse with nuts, smoked halloumi and chocolate cake.
  • But according to food and beverage manager Christophe Guiraud, world leaders can just as easily be seen eating a "normal sandwich."

DAVOS, Switzerland — Between 6,000 and 8,000 people, including world leaders, staff, security and the media are fed every day from the Davos kitchen during the World Economic Forum (WEF).

But what do they eat? Well, they are not eating in a Michelin star restaurant — there is no caviar or foie gras — the man feeding the Davos elite told CNBC Monday.

"Everybody thinks we are serving caviar, we have never served one gram of caviar," said Christophe Guiraud, food and beverage manager at the annual meeting, of the twelve years he has worked at the event.

Christophe Guiraud, the food and beverage manager at the Annual Meeting in Davos.

"We serve very simple things. People are here to share ideas, to meet, they are not here to have a fantastic dinner with a Michelin-star chef ... They are here to work," Guiraud told CNBC.

One of this week's lunch menus, served to representatives from companies such as BP, Goldman Sachs and Facebook includes pumpkin soup, broccoli mousse with nuts, smoked halloumi and chocolate cake.

But according to Guiraud, world leaders can easily be seen eating a "normal sandwich."

"The top leaders in Davos are very easy to handle because they don't have so many people around (them), making things difficult," he said. "For example, you can find a head of state eating a normal sandwich or a normal salad at the bar — this is Davos," Guiraud told CNBC.

WEF has been taking steps to make its kitchen more environmentally friendly. This means the food that is served daily is mostly from Switzerland. 97% of the cheese served is from Davos itself. WEF has also restarted purchases of salmon recently, only after securing a Swiss supplier.

The main kitchen at Davos

"One difficult thing is the region is quite small. Switzerland is quite a small country in the mountains so you really have to define the products that you can find in enough quantities to feed all of these people," Guiraud said, explaining that he struggled to find enough apples last year because local production was insufficient.

WEF is also looking to reduce food waste by using artificial intelligence. The AI technology is installed on several trash cans in the main building that photographs waste and weighs food that has been disposed. The system then provides a report on the different types, weight, costs and sources of the food that has been binned.

This information is then used to analyze and organize future food orders which can help reduce waste.

Using AI to know how much and what kind of food is wasted.