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Finnish businesses, including Nokia, start scheme to utilize smart buildings' data

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Key Points
  • The last few years have seen a number of innovations change the way buildings operate.
  • The scheme in Finland is one of many looking to harness smart technology and make the buildings we live and work in more sustainable. 
FEBRUARY | Moment | Getty Images

Nokia is one of seven Finnish companies aiming to use data to boost the productivity and sustainability of buildings, in the latest example of businesses using technology to change the way the "built environment" operates.

The "KEKO" project was announced Monday by state-owned research center VTT – also one of its founders. It said the project's "ecosystem" would establish a smart platform to collect, analyze and automatically apply data in building maintenance and design. The project is receiving funding from Business Finland, a government organization.

The scheme will last for two years and start by identifying, and then developing, 100 "new use cases for building data."

"In KEKO we will build a digital platform, together with the best industry players in Finland," Rauno Hatakka, head of escalator and elevator firm KONE's technology management unit, said in a statement. KONE is also one of the companies involved in the project.

"We will use the smart building data to innovate new solutions that will predict the needs of building users, and make these environments more functional and responsive," Hatakka added.

Tech, construction and smart buildings

The last few years have seen a number of innovations change the way buildings operate. These include smart lighting technology, which can detect whether people are in a room or not, and heating systems which can be controlled remotely using apps on a cellphone.

The scheme in Finland is one of many looking to harness smart technology and make the buildings we live and work in more sustainable, efficient places.

Last month, for example, a collaboration focused on cutting delays, emissions and waste from building projects received a grant of 28 million Australian dollars (around $17 million) from the country's government.

The scheme, called Building 4.0 CRC, is made of up 30 partners including Lendlease, Monash University, the University of Melbourne and the Donovan Group.

The University of Melbourne laid out several aims for the research initiative including: harnessing digital technology and off-site manufacturing to cut project costs by 30%; reducing construction waste by 80%; and lowering carbon dioxide emissions by 50%.