Politics

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg lies in repose at the Supreme Court

Key Points
  • Three days of memorial ceremonies for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg began Wednesday at the Supreme Court, where her flag-draped coffin was carried past clerks who worked for her during her 27 years on the bench and was brought into the building's Great Hall.
  • A private ceremony for Ginsburg's colleagues, close friends and family took place inside.
  • Members of the public will be allowed to pay their respects to the justice who will lie in repose on Wednesday and Thursday. President Donald Trump is expected to visit on the second day. 

Three days of memorial ceremonies for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg began Wednesday at the Supreme Court, where her flag-draped coffin was carried past clerks who worked for her during her 27 years on the bench and was brought into the building's Great Hall.

A private ceremony for Ginsburg's colleagues, close friends and family took place inside.

Members of the public will be allowed to pay their respects to the justice as she lies in repose on Wednesday and Thursday. President Donald Trump is expected to visit Thursday. 

Read more: Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at age 87

On Friday, one week after her death, Ginsburg will lie in state in the U.S. Capitol, the first woman, first person of Jewish faith and second Supreme Court justice to do so. 

Ginsburg, the senior member of the court's liberal wing, died of complications from pancreatic cancer. She will be buried next week in Arlington National Cemetery, alongside her husband, Marty Ginsburg, who died a decade ago. 

Even as the nation mourns, a fierce battle is underway over her replacement. Trump has said he will name a nominee on Saturday. 

Visitors gather early in the morning

Visitors sit outside the U.S. Supreme Court before a ceremony for late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020.
Stefani Reynolds | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Ginsburg makes her final trip to the Supreme Court

People watch as the flag-draped casket of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg arrives at the Supreme Court in Washington, U.S., September 23, 2020.
Alex Brandon | Reuters

Ginsburg will lie in repose at the Supreme Court for two days

The casket of late Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is carried at the U.S. Supreme Court, where it will lie in repose in Washington, U.S., September 23, 2020.
Erin Scott | Reuters

Former law clerks await her casket as honorary pallbearers

People wait for the casket of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg to arrive at the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, September 23, 2020.
Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images

Hundreds of mourners are expected at the court, including President Donald Trump on Thursday

People watch as the casket of the late US Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg arrives at the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC, September 23, 2020.
Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images

Ginsburg's fiery dissents earned her a devoted following and a nickname: 'Notorious R.B.G.'

A mourner wearing a Ruth Bader Ginsburg-themed face mask reacts as the casket of the late Supreme Court Associate Justice Ginsburg arrives at the U.S. Supreme Court, where it will lie in repose in Washington, September 23, 2020.
Jonathan Ernst | Reuters

A private ceremony for the justice's close friends, colleagues and family took place Wednesday morning

The flag-draped casket of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, carried by Supreme Court police officers, arrives in the Great Hall at the Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on September 23, 2020.
Andrew Harnik | AFP | Getty Images

Ginsburg's casket was placed on the Lincoln Catafalque, constructed to hold President Abraham Lincoln's body in 1865

The flag-draped casket of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is visible as Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts speaks during a private ceremony at the Supreme Court in Washington, September 23, 2020.
Andrew Harnik | Pool | Reuters

Chief Justice John Roberts speaks about his former colleague

Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court, John Roberts, speaks during a private ceremony for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on September 23, 2020.
Andrew Harnik | AFP | Getty Images

The court displayed a 2016 portrait of Ginsburg by artist Constance P. Beaty

A portrait of Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg by artist Constance P. Beaty is displayed following a private ceremony for her at the Supreme Court in Washington, U.S., September 23, 2020.
Andrew Harnik | Pool | Reuters

Justice Brett Kavanaugh, the newest member of the court, shared only one full term with Ginsburg

US Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and his wife Ashley stand during a private ceremony for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court in Washington, DC, on September 23, 2020.
Andrew Harnik | Pool | AFP | Getty Images

Former President Bill Clinton, who nominated Ginsburg in 1993, pays his respects alongside former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton

Former U.S. President Bill Clinton and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton pay their respects to Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as her flag-draped casket is displayed on the west front of the U.S. Supreme Court September 23, 2020 in Washington, DC.
Chip Somodevilla | Getty Images

A woman wipes away her tears

A woman wipes away tears as people pay respects to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as she lies in repose in front of the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC on September 23, 2020.
Alex Brandon | AFP | Getty Images

Ginsburg was seen as a trailblazer for women

People pay respects as Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg lies in repose in front of the US Supreme Court in Washington, DC on September 23, 2020.
Alex Brandon | AFP | Getty Images

By the time of her death, Ginsburg had become a cultural icon

Mouners wearing Ruth Bader Ginsburg-themed T-shirts pays their respects as the casket of the late Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg lies in repose at the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, September 23, 2020.
Jonathan Ernst | Reuters