World Politics

Armenia and Azerbaijan accuse each other of violating new ceasefire agreement

Key Points
  • The fighting is the worst in the region since Azerbaijan and ethnic Armenian forces went to war in the 1990s over Nagorno-Karabakh, a territory that is internationally recognized as part of Azerbaijan but populated and governed by ethnic Armenians.
A mountainous landscape of Nagorno Karabach (self proclaimed Republic of Artsakh) on October 10, 2019. The Republic is a subject of dispute between Azerbaijan and Armenians, it historically is occupied by Armenians but was included into Azerbaijan after the collapse of Soviet Union. Artsakh is today a de facto independent state but it is not recognised by any other party. It is possible to enter Artsakh only through Armenia.
Dominika Zarzycka | NurPhoto via Getty Images

Armenia and Azerbaijan accused each other on Sunday of violating a new humanitarian ceasefire in fighting over Azerbaijan's ethnic Armenian-controlled enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh.

The truce came into force last midnight (2000 GMT).

Short-lived truce

Armenia and Azerbaijan had agreed on Saturday to the ceasefire in fighting over Azerbaijan's ethnic Armenian-controlled enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh, both countries said in identical statements.

Azerbaijan and Armenia had accused each other earlier on Saturday of fresh attacks in violation of a week-old Russian-brokered truce that had failed to halt the worst fighting in the South Caucasus since the 1990s.

Baku said 13 civilians had been killed and more than 50 wounded in the city of Ganja by an Armenian missile attack, while Yerevan accused Azerbaijan of continued shelling.

The fighting is the worst in the region since Azerbaijan and ethnic Armenian forces went to war in the 1990s over Nagorno-Karabakh, a territory that is internationally recognized as part of Azerbaijan but populated and governed by ethnic Armenians.