Politics

GOP former Sen. Bob Corker says 'enough is enough,' Trump 'knows he's lost' the election

Share
Key Points
  • Republican former Sen. Bob Corker said on CNBC on Wednesday he hopes the Republican Party does not return to the leadership style of the past four years.
  • "Enough is enough. He knows he's lost," Corker said of Trump, who has refused to concede the election to Joe Biden and continues to falsely claim he won.
  • Corker said Trump has "undermined" the democracy and the character of the nation.
VIDEO4:4404:44
I'm horrified and saddened at what's happening at the Capitol: Fmr. Sen. Bob Corker

Republican former Sen. Bob Corker said on CNBC on Wednesday that President Donald Trump should depart to Florida and that he hopes the Republican Party does not return to the leadership style of the past four years.

Corker's comments came as law enforcement in Washington worked to restore order to the U.S. Capitol after the complex came under siege by Trump supporters opposing and delaying congressional confirmation of the 2020 election's Electoral College vote.

"Enough is enough. He knows he's lost," Corker, who retired after his term ended in January 2019, said of Trump, who has refused to concede the election to President-elect Joe Biden and continues to falsely claim he won. While on Capitol Hill, the Tennessee Republican had also been the longtime chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

During a phone interview with CNBC's Shepard Smith, Corker highlighted that Republicans, who controlled both chambers of Congress in Trump's first two years in office, achieved a number of policy priorities, including helping to normalize relations between Israel and the United Arab Emirates.

The two-term senator also applauded, as part of Trump's achievements, the economic growth the country experienced prior to the coronavirus pandemic-induced recession.

Corker criticized, however, Trump's methods of leadership, saying that he has "undermined" the democracy and the character of the nation.

"It's time for him to go back to Florida," he said, referring to Trump's decision to move his residency from New York to the Sunshine State last year. "We created such divisiveness that's going to be very hard to overcome, and I hope that Republicans will never ever return to that type of leadership," Corker added.

Corker was one of a handful of party members who were vocal about their opposition to some of the policies pushed forward by the Trump administration.

A notable incident was Corker's criticism of Trump for his "very fine people" response to the 2017 white supremacist rally in Virginia over Confederate monuments, a protest that turned deadly. Then a senator, Corker said at the time that the president lacked the "stability" and "competence" needed to be successful in the office.

Trump responded by saying that Tennessee was "not happy" with Corker, who decided the next month not to run for reelection in 2018. Corker, first elected senator in 2006, said he was not interested in serving more than two terms. Republican Sen. Marsha Blackburn now holds the seat.