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With extreme weather set to stress the grid, solar and energy storage companies may see a boost

Dry land is visible, at a section that is normally under water, on the banks of Lake Oroville, which is the second largest reservoir in California and according to daily reports of the state's Department of Water Resources is near 35% capacity near Oroville, California, June 16, 2021.
Aude Guerrucci | Reuters

The Pacific Northwest is bracing for a heatwave that's expected to shatter record-high temperatures, potentially stressing an electrical grid that's already under intense pressure. This month, grid operators from California to Texas have asked consumers to curb usage just when it's needed most, and with rolling blackouts and total outages becoming more frequent, some are taking matters into their own hands by way of residential energy storage. 

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