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Biden says Putin should be tried for war crimes, slapped with more sanctions; Russia accused of civilian massacre in Bucha

This has been CNBC's live blog covering updates on the war in Ukraine. [Follow the latest updates here.]

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has accused Russian forces of committing genocide, saying Ukrainian people were being "destroyed and exterminated." His comments came in the wake of the reported devastation in Bucha, a town 23 miles northwest of Kyiv that has been liberated by Ukrainian forces.

The mayor of Bucha told Reuters that 300 residents had been killed while fighters from Chechnya controlled the area. Russia has denied allegations that its troops killed civilians in Bucha.

Ukraine's top prosecutor said 410 bodies were found in towns recaptured from retreating Russian forces near Kyiv as part of an investigation into possible war crimes, according to reporting by Reuters.

Russia's chief negotiator Vladimir Medinsky said draft peace treaty talks will resume on Monday, underlining that the Kremlin's position on Crimea and Donbas remains unchanged.

Editor's note: Graphic content. Some of the posts contain images of the dead found after Russians pulled back from Bucha.

China's foreign minister speaks with Ukrainian counterpart for the first time in a month

China's Foreign Minister Wang Yi spoke to his Ukrainian counterpart, Dmytro Kuleba, on a phone call state media said was made at Ukraine's request.  

This is the first reported high-level conversation between the countries since March 1, when Kuleba asked Beijing to use its ties with Moscow to stop Russia's invasion, the Ukrainian foreign ministry said at the time.

Wang repeated China's message that peace and stability should be achieved through negotiation, according to state media.

Kuleba tweeted: "Grateful to my Chinese counterpart for solidarity with civilian victims."

"We both share the conviction that ending the war against Ukraine serves common interests of peace, global food security, and international trade," he added.

— Chelsea Ong

Zelenskyy to address UN Security Council Tuesday after visiting Bucha

A man stands next to graves with bodies of civilians, who according to local residents were killed by Russian soldiers, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, in Bucha, in Kyiv region, Ukraine April 4, 2022.
Vladyslav Musiienko | Reuters

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy will address the UN Security Council on Tuesday after visiting Bucha, according to a tweet from the UK UN.

"The UK Presidency of the Council will ensure the truth is heard about Russia's war crimes. We will expose Putin's war for what it really is," the account tweeted.

Zelenskyy has accused Russian forces of committing genocide, and said Ukrainians were being "destroyed and exterminated." His comments came in the wake of the reported devastation in Bucha, a town 23 miles northwest of Kyiv that has been liberated by Ukrainian forces.

Riya Bhattacharjee

Oil jumps over 3% as deaths near Kyiv prompt talk of new sanctions

A worker walks past oil barrels at a filling station in Chennai on February 24, 2022.
Arun Sankar | AFP | Getty Images

Oil prices jumped over 3% with investors worried about tighter supply as mounting civilian deaths in Ukraine increased pressure on European countries to impose sanctions on Russia's energy sector.

Global benchmark Brent crude jumped $3.14, or 3%, to settle at $107.53 a barrel. U.S. West Texas Intermediate crude rose $4.01, or 4%, to settle at $103.28 a barrel. Trading was volatile with both contracts rising after being down more than $1.

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz said Russian President Vladimir Putin and his supporters would "feel the consequences" of events in Bucha, outside the capital Kyiv, where a mass grave and tied bodies shot at close range were found.

Western allies would agree on further sanctions against Moscow in coming days, he said, though the timing and reach of the new package was not clear. France's President Emmanuel Macron suggested sanctions on oil and coal, adding there were very "clear clues pointing to war crimes" by Russian forces.

— Reuters

Evidence of war crimes mount in Bucha amid Russian retreat

Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskiy speaks to a local resident, as Russia's attack on Ukraine continues, in the town of Bucha, outside of Kyiv, Ukraine April 4, 2022. 
Ukrainian Presidential Press Service | Reuters

Editor's Note: Graphic content. The following post contains images of dead bodies found in the suburban Kyiv town of Bucha.

The Kremlin faced renewed global outrage and accusations of war crimes on the heels of a grisly discovery of civilians tortured and shot at close range in the streets of Bucha, Ukraine.

SENSITIVE MATERIAL. THIS IMAGE MAY OFFEND OR DISTURB A body with hands bound by white cloth, who according to residents was shot by Russian soldiers, lies in the street, amid Russia's invasion on Ukraine, in Bucha, Ukraine April 3, 2022. 
Zohra Bensemra | Reuters
EDITORS NOTE: Graphic content: Dead bodies lie on a street in Bucha, northwest of Kyiv, on April 2, 2022, as Ukraine says Russian forces are making a "rapid retreat" from northern areas around Kyiv and the city of Chernigiv.
Ronaldo Schemidt | AFP | Getty Images

Over the weekend, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy traveled from Kyiv to the nearby town of Bucha to see the aftermath of a Russian troop pullout which he later described as a "genocide." Bodies of civilians lay scattered across the streets, some with their hands tied and gunshot wounds to the back of the head.

EDITORS NOTE: Graphic content: Communal workers carry a civilian in a body bag after he was killed during Russian army shelling in the town of Bucha, not far from the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv on April 3, 2022.
Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images
(EDITOR'S NOTE: Image depicts death) The body of a man lays inside a car ran over by a Russian tank in Bucha district on the outskirts of Kyiv, after the Ukrainian army secured the area following the withdrawal of the Russian army from the Kyiv region on previous days, Bucha, Ukraine on April 03, 2022. (Photo by Narciso Contreras/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)
Narciso Contreras | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

U.S. National security advisor Jake Sullivan called the images from Bucha "tragic" and "shocking."

"Unfortunately, they're not surprising. We released information even before Russia's invasion showing that Russia would engage in acts of brutality against civilians," Sullivan told reporters at the White House. Biden's top security advisor said the U.S. was working on additional sanctions measures alongside European allies.

EDITORS NOTE: Graphic content A dead body lies on the ground in a street in Bucha, northwest of Kyiv, as Ukraine says Russian forces are making a "rapid retreat" from northern areas around Kyiv and the city of Chernigiv, on April 2, 2022.
Ronaldo Schemidt | AFP | Getty Images
EDITORS NOTE: Graphic content A man walks on a street with several dead bodies on the ground a street in Bucha, northwest of Kyiv, as Ukraine says Russian forces are making a "rapid retreat" from northern areas around Kyiv and the city of Chernigiv, on April 2, 2022.
Ronaldo Schemidt | AFP | Getty Images

Earlier on Monday, President Joe Biden called Russian leader Vladimir Putin a "war criminal" who should be put on trial for ordering violence in Ukraine.

"This guy is brutal, and what's happening in Bucha is outrageous and everyone's seen it," Biden told reporters gathered at Fort McNair, adding, "I think it is a war crime ... He should be held accountable."

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Image depicts death) Civilians' bodies, which were found dead in the Ukrainian town of Bucha, were gathered to be buried on Monday, on April 4, 2022 in Bucha, Ukraine.
Metkin Atkis| Anadolu Agency | Getty Images
Bodies of civilians are seen in a mass grave in the town of Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, after the Ukrainian army secured the area following the withdrawal of the Russian army from the Kyiv region on previous days, Bucha, Ukraine on April 03, 2022.
Narciso Contreras | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

Since the Kremlin's Feb. 24 invasion of Ukraine, the United Nations has confirmed 1,430 civilian deaths and 2,097 injuries. The war has also displaced more than 4.2 million Ukrainians, mostly the elderly, women and children.

EDITORS NOTE: Graphic Content: A communal worker standing inside a van loaded with body bags, waits for another body to be wrapped and collected by a colleague following Russian shelling of the town of Bucha, not far from the Ukrainian capital of Kyiv on April 3, 2022.
Sergei Supinsky | AFP | Getty Images
Volunteers unload from a van bags containing bodies of civilians, who according to residents were killed by Russian army soldiers, after they collected them from the streets to gather them at a cemetery before they take them to the morgue, amid Russia's invasion of Ukraine, in Bucha, in Kyiv region, Ukraine April 4, 2022. 
Zohra Bensemra | Reuters

— Amanda Macias and Adam Jeffery

White House warns of renewed Russian fight in Ukraine after weeks of slow gains

A man walks in the rubble of a destroyed building in the eastern Ukraine city of Kharkiv on april 2, 2022, as Ukraine said today Russian forces were making a "rapid retreat" from northern areas around the capital Kyiv and the city of Chernihiv.
Fadel Senna | AFP | Getty Images

National security advisor Jake Sullivan warned that Russian forces are currently gearing up for a more aggressive fight in Ukraine after nearly six weeks of war.

"At this juncture, we believe that Russia is revising its war aims. Russia is repositioning its forces to concentrate its offensive operations in eastern and parts of southern Ukraine, rather than target most of the territory," Sullivan told reporters, citing failed Russian attempts to capture Kyiv.

"All indications are that Russia will seek to surround and overwhelm Ukrainian forces in eastern Ukraine. We anticipate that Russian commanders are now executing the redeployment from northern Ukraine to the region around the Donbas," Sullivan added.

He added that Russia's renewed ground offensive in eastern Ukraine will likely also "include air and missile strikes across the rest of the country to cause military and economic damage, and frankly, to cause terror."

— Amanda Macias

France and Germany expel additional Russians from diplomatic missions

A national flags of Ukraine an EU flags outside the Town Hall in Lille, France, on Wednesday, March 16, 2022.
Chris Ratcliffe | Bloomberg | Getty Images

France and Germany said they were expelling several Russian personnel serving under the cover of diplomatic status, citing security concerns.

"France decided this evening to expel many Russian personnel with diplomatic status assigned to France whose activities are contrary to our security interests," the French Foreign Ministry said in a statement.

"This action is part of a European approach. Our first responsibility is always to ensure the safety of French and Europeans," the statement added.

Berlin also barred several Russian personnel from continuing their work within Germany.

"Their work is a threat to those who seek shelter with us. We will no longer tolerate this," German Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock said in a statement.

Last week, in a coordinated move, Ireland, Belgium, the Netherlands and the Czech Republic expelled a total of 43 Russian diplomats suspected of spying. The action followed similar steps taken by Poland.

— Amanda Macias

Russian oligarch Vekselberg accused of fraud, money laundering as his yacht is seized

U.S. officials accused Russian oligarch Viktor Vekselberg of bank fraud and money laundering as his yacht was seized in Spain.

The seizure of the $90 million mega yacht followed a move by the U.S. and its allies to sanction Vekselberg in response to Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

An FBI search warrant alleged Vekselberg conspired to commit bank fraud and money laundering to obscure his ownership of the yacht.

A spokesperson for Vekselberg did not respond to a request to comment.

— Brian Schwartz

UK calls for more sanctions: 'Money is still flowing from the West into Putin's war machine'

British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss at a G7 meeting in the Museum of Liverpool.
Christopher Furlong | Getty Images

UK Foreign Secretary Liz Truss called for tougher sanctions against Russia during a joint press conference with Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba in Warsaw.

Since Russia's Feb. 24 invasion of Ukraine, the UK has delivered its strongest sanctions ever levied on a country.

"The reality is that money is still flowing from the West into Putin's war machine and that has to stop," Truss said, adding that she would raise this issue with G-7 and NATO allies this week.

Truss also joined the U.S. in calling for Russia's suspension from the United Nations Human Rights Council. Her demand came on the heels of alarming reports of attacks on civilians in the Ukrainian town of Bucha outside Kyiv.

"After these appalling crimes, Russia has no place on the Human Rights Council," she said, adding that the UK is currently gathering evidence of war crimes in Ukraine.

— Amanda Macias

U.S. military cannot independently confirm war crimes in Bucha, Defense official says

Editor's Note: Graphic content. The following post contains a photo of dead bodies found in the suburban Kyiv town of Bucha.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Image depicts death) A partially buried body is seen in a mass grave in the town of Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, after the Ukrainian army secured the area following the withdrawal of the Russian army from the Kyiv region on previous days, Bucha, Ukraine on April 03, 2022.
Narciso Contreras | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

The U.S. military could not independently confirm reports of mounting evidence of Russian war crimes in Ukraine.

A senior U.S. Defense official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to share details of the Pentagon's thinking, described the reports of atrocities in Bucha, a town in the suburbs of Kyiv, as "clearly deeply troubling."

The official, who was aware of the accounts out of Bucha, described the imagery as "disgusting" and "sickening." The official added that the U.S. had no evidence that Russian troops were given specific orders to kill civilians in Bucha.

Earlier on Monday, President Joe Biden called Russian leader Vladimir Putin a "war criminal" who should be put on trial for ordering violence in Ukraine.

"This guy is brutal, and what's happening in Bucha is outrageous and everyone's seen it," Biden told reporters gathered at Fort McNair, adding, "I think it is a war crime ... He should be held accountable."

— Amanda Macias

About 65% Russian forces have left Kyiv, U.S. Defense official says

A Ukrainian policeman walks past the wreckage of a Russian armoured vehicle in Dmytrivka village, west of Kyiv, on April 2, 2022 as Ukraine says Russian forces are making a "rapid retreat" from northern areas around Kyiv and the city of Chernigiv.
Genya Savilov | Afp | Getty Images

About 65% of the Russian forces once near Kyiv have now re-positioned closer to Belarus, according to a senior U.S. Defense official.

The U.S. believes these Russian troops are being resupplied with additional manpower in Belarus before deploying back to the fight in Ukraine. When asked where the troops would likely go, the official said that the Pentagon believes the majority of them will move to the Donbas region but has not seen such a deployment.

The Defense official says that the U.S. believes that the "vast majority" of Russian forces are still in Ukraine and that Kyiv is still under threat.

— Amanda Macias

Biden calls for war crimes trial for Putin

US President Joe Biden speaks to reporters upon arrival at Fort McNair in Washington, DC on April 4, 2022.
Mandel Ngan | AFP | Getty Images

President Joe Biden said Russian leader Vladimir Putin should be put on trial for war crimes after Ukrainian leaders told Reuters they found 410 dead bodies in towns recaptured from retreating Russian forces near Kyiv, including 300 civilians in Bucha.

"He is a war criminal," Biden said of Putin, on the heels of reports of mass killings of civilians by Russian-controlled troops in the town of Bucha, northwest of Ukraine's capital of Kyiv.

Russia has denied killing civilians in Bucha.

"This guy is brutal, and what's happening in Bucha is outrageous and everyone's seen it," Biden told reporters. "I think it is a war crime ... He should be held accountable."

Biden also said he plans to slap additional sanctions on Russia for its unprovoked attack on Ukraine.

— Dan Mangan

Portraits of war: How Russia's invasion has affected the Ukrainian people

Since Russian President Vladimir Putin's Feb. 24 invasion of Ukraine, the United Nations has confirmed 1,430 civilian deaths and 2,097 injuries but says the real toll is likely higher.

The war has also displaced more than 4.2 million Ukrainians, mostly the elderly, women and children.

Here is a look at some of the faces and lives forever changed by Russia's horrific war.

Editor's Note: Some images may contain graphic content.

Ukrainian refugees shelter from the rain as they wait to a board a bus, bound for Przemysl after crossing the Ukraine-Poland border, amid the Russian invasion of Ukraine, in Medyka, Poland, April 1, 2022.
Hannah Mckay | Reuters
Relatives of Ukrainian military member, Yuriy Oliynyk, become emotional during his burial at the Lychakiv Cemetery on March 31, 2022 in Lviv, Ukraine.
Joe Raedle | Getty Images
A Ukrainian serviceman smokes a cigaret in a trench at the front line east of Kharkiv on March 31, 2022.
Fadel Senna | AFP | Getty Images
Residents walk past a damaged Russian military vehicle in the northeastern city of Trostianets, on March 29, 2022.
Fadel Senna | AFP | Getty Images
EDITORS NOTE: Graphic content: Dead bodies lie on a street in Bucha, northwest of Kyiv, on April 2, 2022, as Ukraine says Russian forces are making a "rapid retreat" from northern areas around Kyiv and the city of Chernigiv.
Ronaldo Schemidt | AFP | Getty Images

— Adam Jeffery and Amanda Macias

U.S. calls for suspension of Russia from UN Human Rights Council

US Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield makes a statement at a stakeout at the Security Council at UN Headquarters. Meeting was convened at the request of the Russian Federation who accused Ukraine of developing biological weapons under the tutelage of the United States without providing any evidence.
Lev Radin | Lightrocket | Getty Images

The United States is pushing for Russia's removal from the United Nations Human Rights Council following mounting evidence of war crimes committed by its forces in Ukraine.

U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Linda Thomas-Greenfield said the U.S. would seek Russia's suspension "following horrific reports about violence against civilians in Bucha." 

Thomas-Greenfield made the comments during a meeting with the Romanian Prime Minister Nicolae Ciuca. She thanked Romania for taking in more than 600,000 refugees from Ukraine and reaffirmed U.S. support for Romania, according to a statement from Olivia Dalton, the U.S. spokesperson at the United Nations.

— Amanda Macias

JPMorgan CEO Dimon says Ukraine war, inflation, Covid may ‘dramatically increase risks ahead’

Jamie Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan Chase speaks to the Economic Club of New York in New York, January 16, 2019.
Carlo Allegri | Reuters

Jamie Dimon, CEO and chairman of the biggest U.S. bank by assets, pointed to a potentially unprecedented combination of risks facing the country in his annual shareholder letter.

Three forces are likely to shape the world over the next several decades: a U.S. economy rebounding from the Covid pandemic; high inflation that will usher in an era of rising rates, and Russia's invasion of Ukraine and the resulting humanitarian crisis now underway, according to Dimon, CEO of JPMorgan.

"Each of these three factors mentioned above is unique in its own right: The dramatic stimulus-fueled recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, the likely need for rapidly raising rates and the required reversal of QE, and the war in Ukraine and the sanctions on Russia," Dimon wrote.

"They present completely different circumstances than what we've experienced in the past – and their confluence may dramatically increase the risks ahead," he wrote. "While it is possible, and hopeful, that all of these events will have peaceful resolutions, we should prepare for the potential negative outcomes."

— Hugh Son

Russia’s economy is beginning to crack

A woman looks at empty shelves in a supermarket in Moscow. There has been shortages of women's sanitary pads, diapers, and sugar after many foreign brands announced they were suspending their operations in Russia in light if the country's military operation in Ukraine.
Vlad Karkov | Lightrocket | Getty Images

The Russian economy is set to shrink sharply this year while inflation skyrockets, as punitive international sanctions in response to its unprovoked invasion of Ukraine begin to bite.

The S&P Global purchasing managers' index (PMI) for Russia, published on Friday, dropped from 48.6 in February to 44.1 in March, with anything below 50 representing contraction.

Read the full story here.

—Matt Clinch

Putin imposes new visa restrictions

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting with officials and cultural workers, including young holders of prizes for cultural achievements, via a video link in Moscow, Russia March 25, 2022. 
Mikhail Klimentyev | Reuters

Russia has suspended its simplified visa issuance regime for nationals of what it calls "unfriendly" countries.

President Vladimir Putin signed the decree on Monday, according to Reuters, and it will impact some European Union nations as well as Norway, Switzerland, Denmark and Iceland.

Russia faces barrage of new sanctions

The U.S. and its European allies are preparing to deliver another slew of sanctions on Russia following mounting evidence of war crimes committed by its forces in Ukraine.

A statement from the European Council said Monday. "The European Union condemns in the strongest possible terms the reported atrocities committed by the Russian armed forces in a number of occupied Ukrainian towns, that have now been liberated."

"The massacres in the town of Bucha and other Ukrainian towns will be inscribed in the list of atrocities committed on European soil."

Haunting photos of residential streets strewn with bodies have been published by international news outlets. Russia is denying the accusations, calling the photos "another provocation" from Ukraine. 

Read the full story here.

—Matt Clinch

Hungary’s nationalist leader Orban criticizes Ukraine’s Zelenskyy

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban delivers a speech on stage next to members of the Fidesz party at their election base, 'Balna' building on the bank of the Danube River of Budapest, on April 3, 2022. - Nationalist Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban claimed a "great victory" in general election, as partial results gave his Fidesz party the lead. (Photo by Attila KISBENEDEK / AFP) (Photo by ATTILA KISBENEDEK/AFP via Getty Images)
Attila Kisbenedek | Afp | Getty Images

Hungary's Prime Minister Viktor Orban dubbed his Ukrainian counterpart, Volodymyr Zelenskyy, one of his opponents on Sunday evening, following a landslide election victory for the nationalist leader.

Read the full story here.

—Matt Clinch

How Russian banks got cut out of global finance

Several Russian banks were banned from the SWIFT financial-messaging system following Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine. So, what does it mean to lose access to this important part of the international economy, and are there any viable alternatives?

CNBC's Nessa Anwar has the full story.

VIDEO9:5009:50
How Russian banks got cut out of global finance: A 'SWIFT' system explainer

—Matt Clinch

British foreign secretary to visit Poland, calls for tougher sanctions against Russia

British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss will travel on Monday to Poland's capital to meet her Ukrainian and Polish counterparts ahead of talks with G-7 and NATO allies later this week.

Truss is expected to call for tougher sanctions against Russia in a bid to bolster Ukraine's negotiating position in peace talks.

"Putin is yet to show he is serious about diplomacy. A tough approach from the UK and our allies is vital to strengthen Ukraine's hand in negotiations," Truss said in a statement.

"Britain has helped lead the way with sanctions to cripple the Putin war machine. We will do more to ramp up the pressure on Russia and we will keep pushing others to do more," she added.

— Sam Meredith

Images show devastation in Ukraine in the wake of Russia's invasion

Here's a selection of images depicting Russia's war in Ukraine over the last 24 hours:

A family grieve for a missing relative in front of a mass grave in the town of Bucha, on the outskirts of Kyiv, on April 3, 2022.
Narciso Contreras | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images
A Ukrainian serviceman walks by the wreckage of a cargo aircraft at the military airport in the town of Hostomel, on the outskirts of Kyiv, on April 3, 2022.
Narciso Contreras | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images
People stand in a bus as an evacuation convoy of buses and cars arrives at a displaced persons' hub in Zaporizhzhia, in the early hours of April 4, 2022.
Emre Caylak | Afp | Getty Images
People cook a meal in Ukraine's besieged port city of Mariupol on April 4, 2022.
Anadolu Agency | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images
A mother and daughter outside their destroyed home in the port city of Mariupol.
Sopa Images | Lightrocket | Getty Images

— Sam Meredith; Getty Images

Bucha killings to prompt further sanctions; EU to discuss import ban on Russian gas

In what appears to mark a major policy shift, Germany has called for EU talks on whether to impose an import ban on Russian gas deliveries.
Picture Alliance | Picture Alliance | Getty Images

European leaders have called for a wave of tougher economic sanctions against Russia in light of the devastation in the Ukrainian town of Bucha.

German Defense Minister Christian Lindner has said the European Union must discuss banning the import of Russian gas deliveries.

That appears to mark a major policy shift for Europe's largest economy, and comes as pressure intensifies on policymakers to further isolate the Kremlin on the global stage.

Berlin has so far resisted calls to impose an embargo on Russian energy exports, citing the region's dependence on Russian gas. Russia supplies around 40% of Europe's gas supplies.

Separately, Italy's Foreign Minister Luigi Di Maio told the country's Rai 3 channel that events in Bucha would trigger a new wave of sanctions, Reuters reported, before adding that there could soon be a debate on whether to impose an import ban on Russian fossil fuels.

— Sam Meredith

'Crime against humanity': Georgia strongly condemns killings in Ukraine's Bucha

Fans waving the flags of Ukraine and Georgia at a match between Georgia and Spain at the Rugby Europe International Championship on March 20 in Tbilisi, Georgia. Russia fought a war with Georgia in 2008, after which it recognized as independent the breakaway regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia.
Levan Verdzeuli | Getty Images Sport | Getty Images

Georgia's Foreign Ministry has strongly condemned the killings in Ukraine's Bucha, saying it is "devastated by the scenes of brutal atrocities."

"All those involved in these war crimes must bear responsibility," the ministry said on Twitter.

Separately, President Salome Zourabichvili said the "massacre" in Bucha was a "crime against humanity."

Russia has recognized the breakaway regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia as independent after fighting a war with Georgia in 2008.

The country, which borders Russia and sits at the intersection of Europe and Asia, has repeatedly voiced support for the people of Ukraine but refused to join economic sanctions designed to isolate the Kremlin.

— Sam Meredith

Russia requests UN Security Council meeting over 'Ukrainian radicals’ provocation in Bucha'

"In light of the Ukrainian radicals' provocation in Bucha, Russia has requested a meeting of the United Nations Security Council in the second half of the day on Monday, April 4," Dmitry Polyanskiy (above) said via Telegram, according to state news agency Tass.
Anadolu Agency | Anadolu Agency | Getty Images

Russia's United Nations Security Council deputy representative has requested an emergency meeting on Monday, citing "the Ukrainian radicals' provocation in Bucha."

That comes in the wake of the reported devastation in Bucha, a town on the outskirts of Kyiv that has been liberated by Ukrainian forces.

Ukraine has accused Russia of a civilian massacre in Bucha, with international leaders condemning the graphic footage and images of dead bodies and calling for an independent investigation.

Russia has denied allegations that its troops killed civilians in Bucha.

"In light of the Ukrainian radicals' provocation in Bucha, Russia has requested a meeting of the United Nations Security Council in the second half of the day on Monday, April 4," Dmitry Polyanskiy said via Telegram, according to state news agency Tass. "We will unmask Ukrainian provocateurs and their Western patrons."

Polyanskiy did not elaborate on how Ukrainians were being provocative in Bucha, a city which Russian troops invaded as part of their failed drive toward Kyiv.

— Sam Meredith

Ukraine deputy PM says humanitarian corridors set up in Mangush, Mariupol and Luhansk

Ukraine Deputy Prime Minister Iryna Vereshchuk says humanitarian corridors have been set up in Mangush, Mariupol and Luhansk.

Vereshchuk said a corridor was in place on Monday to take people from the besieged city of Mariupol to Zaporizhia.

Meanwhile, the Red Cross plans to continue its movement from Mangush to Mariupol, with seven buses on the way, Vereshchuk said, while evacuations continue in the Luhansk region.

— Sam Meredith

'Beyond reprehensible' and 'a punch to the gut': World reacts to images of Bucha devastation

Ukrainian soldiers inspect the wreckage of a destroyed Russian armored column on the road in Bucha, a suburb north of Kyiv.
Sopa Images | Lightrocket | Getty Images

Ukraine accused Russian forces of carrying out a "massacre" in the town of Bucha, while Western leaders reacted to the images of dead bodies on the outskirts of Kyiv and called for an independent investigation.

Russia has denied the allegations, describing the graphic video footage and photographs of bodies as "yet another provocation" by the Ukrainian government.

German Chancellor Olaf Scholz called the killings at Bucha "horrific and terrible," while the country's Foreign Minister Annalena Baerbock described the images as "unbearable."

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said he was "deeply shocked" by the images of dead civilians in Bucha and U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken said they were akin to "a punch to the gut."

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern called the reported atrocities "beyond reprehensible" and Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida told reporters he strongly condemned the attacks.

— Sam Meredith

Russian forces refocusing their offensive on Donbas, UK says

A woman reacts before the train leaves the eastern city of Kramatorsk, in the Donbas region, on April 3, 2022.
Fadel Senna | Afp | Getty Images

Russian forces are continuing to refocus their offensive into the Donbas region of east Ukraine, according to the U.K. Defence Ministry.

"Russian troops, including mercenaries from the Russian state-linked Wagner private military company, are being moved into the area," the ministry said via Twitter.

— Sam Meredith

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