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  • Apple iPhone

    CNN is coming out with an iPhone application Tuesday that has a feature few other news apps have tried: a price tag.

  • Kobe Bryant autographed card

    There's little doubt that Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant is the hottest marketing commodity in the NBA. Just look at jersey sales as a metric - his No. 24 is the top NBA jersey across the world. That's one of the reasons why Panini, the trading card company that surprised the collecting world by scoring the exclusive deal with the NBA in January, signed the four-time world champion and reigning NBA Finals MVP to a multi-year deal.

  • Move over Wall Street, there’s a new victim in town: Advertising. And they've got a jingle to prove it.

  • Today, OptionIt, a sports ticket option company, announced that it was offering ticket options for the upcoming season for Boston Celtics home games. Here's my chat with company CEO Mark Mastalir on how the options work and why he thinks this idea will last.

  • nfl_logo_1.jpg

    Earlier this year, ESPN.com's Lester Munson said American Needle v. NFL "could easily be the most significant legal turning point in the history of American sports." It involves a manufacturer named American Needle who sued the league when they unilaterally gave exclusive apparel rights to Reebok, which essentially knocked them out of the business. The argument was that the move violated the Sherman Anti-Trust Act and illegally restricted competition.

  • Sports Radio Interviews

    When Cowboys great Tony Dorsett made fiery comments about Tony Romo, I saw it first on a small independent Web site. When Minnesota Vikings great Fran Tarkenton bashed Brett Favre, I saw it first on a small independent Web site. How did this site get the scoop? Because its founder was listening when no one else was.

  • Twitter

    Twitter is on track to raise $100 Million dollars in financing, which would make the micro-blogging site, which currently doesn't have much of a revenue stream, valued at $1 Billion.

  • Ping Pong

    As Advertising Week wraps up here in New York, one major marketer, Budweiser, is sponsoring what it hopes will be the next hot sport to succeed Poker - Ping Pong!

  • In this era of Facebook ads and company-customer interaction through Twitter, direct marketing that shows up in your mail box seems incredibly outdated. I mean, junk mail? Really?

  • Serena Williams

    The early read on Serena Williams' marketability following her outburst in the U.S. Open final was that she wouldn't be hurt in the endorsement world. None of her sponsors - Nike, Gatorade and Kraft  - dropped her and one endorsement, signed before the Open, was even announced in the days after she was criticized for her behavior.

  • Mikhail Prokhorov

    A year and a half ago, I predicted that more foreign ownership was coming to American sports leagues. I told you how you’ll soon see an NBA team owned by a Chinese businessman and a Russian owning an NHL team. At the time, the biggest reason to think this was the premium that foreign interests were willing to pay for teams. But that was before we knew we were really in a recession.

  • Mike Crabtree

    Thanks to his flash at Texas Tech, Michael Crabtree was a valuable commodity when he entered the NFL Draft earlier this year. Even after he broke his left foot at the Combine, which caused him to slip to 10th pick by the San Francisco 49ers, the wide receiver’s future potential still had people buzzing. But the longest holdout in NFL rookie history is starting to hurt the Crabtree, whose team has started 2-0 without him.

  • Capitalism: A Love Story

    As CNBC spends the month examining the economic melt down one year ago and how far we've come, Michael Moore takes the one-year anniversary to release his new documentary, "Capitalism: A Love Story" which skewers the financial system. The documentary doesn't look at the big banks that failed, but at the people who suffered. And yes, the title is ironic: Capitalism is the bad guy.

  • Temperature Management System

    Having Peyton Manning instead of Chad Pennington gave the Colts a significant advantage heading into last night’s game against the Dolphins. But from a keeping cool standpoint, the two sides were equal. That’s because both were using the Temperature Management System, which uses compressors to blow cold dry air through the pads of the players on both teams while the they are sitting on the bench.

  • urlacher_brian_AP.jpg

    I’ve been covering the memorabilia industry for a long time, but I’ve actually never seen a high-profile player’s contract. This lawsuit gives us a peek into what they look like and it’s extremely fascinating.

  • The most popular social network-Facebook- is teaming up with the most powerful media measurement giant-Nielsen-to prove that social media ads work. At Advertising Week in New York I sat down with Sheryl Sandberg, Facebook's Chief Operating Officer in her first live TV interview since taking the post last year.

  • At Advertising Week in New York I had a chance to sit down with AOL CEO Tim Armstrong in his first TV interview since taking over the troubled company. As AOL heads towards an IPO, spinning off from Time Warner before the end of the year, Armstrong is hard at work turning the division known for its subscription web mail service - a revenue stream that no longer exists - into an ad-oriented, content-driven company.

  • Guitar Hero may not be ad supported but the music video game brand certainly knows about using ads to lure consumers; that's the subject of the panel its CEO, Dan Rosensweig, participated in during Advertising Week's morning session today.

  • The sixth annual Ad Week kicks off today at the New York Times building in midtown Manhattan. Everyone who was here last year can't help but reminisce about the financial meltdown that unfolded during September 2008's event. Last year ad spending was already starting to decline, so this year the big question is whether the ad dollars are coming back and, if so, where will they go?

  • Sponsorium

    It’s no secret that sports marketing budgets have been cut from the recession and the money that is being spent is being scrutinized more than ever before. So instead of waiting to evaluate the return on investment on a particular relationship, many companies are now trying to prove their return on investment before they even do a deal with a property.