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Business Africa

  • Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi

    From Liberia to South Africa to the island of Madagascar, Libya’s holdings are like a giant venture capital fund, geared to make friends and wi n influence in the poorest region in the world.  The NYT reports.

  • Libyan rebel fighters stand ready with anti-aircraft weapons at a checkpoint on the outskirts of Ras Lanuf on March 6, 2011 which in spite of air strikes by the regime, the key oil pipeline hub was still in rebel hands, AFP correspondents reported, countering claims by a state-owned television that it had been recaptured. AFP PHOTO / MARCO LONGARI (Photo credit should read MARCO LONGARI/AFP/Getty Images)

    The leader of Libya’s rebellion has warned countries that have failed to support the uprising against Muammer Gaddafi that they would be denied access to Libya’s vast oil riches if the regime is deposed, the Financial Times reports.

  • Muammer Gaddafi

    The Libyan leader Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi has “tens of billions” in cash secretly hidden away in Tripoli, allowing him to prolong his fight against rebel forces.

  • Libyan opposition supporters demonstrate in Benghazi, Libya.

    Many in Europe worry that they will face new waves of illegal immigration not only from the liberated areas in the north, but from much of sub-Saharan Africa as well, the New York Times reports.

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  • Somali Pirates

    On Tuesday, Somali pirates shot and killed four American hostages. A single hostage intentionally killed by these pirates had been almost unheard of; four dead was unprecedented. The New York Times reports.

  • As anger spreads throughout the Arab world, retired Gen. Wesley Clark said Saudi Arabia will be the last country to see an uprising.

  • Demonstrators hold up a banner featuring Libyan leader Moamer Kadhafi reading 'Kadhafi is a murderer' as they stage a protest outside the Libyan embassy in Istanbul on February 21, 2011

    Aecom, a Los Angeles-based company with employees around the world, is pulling all of its American workers out of Libya, as turmoil in the nation intensifies.

  • Egyptian demonstrators protest in central Cairo amidst tear gas fire by Egyptian police to demand the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak and calling for reforms.

    The protests in Egypt are unsettling regimes around the world as thousands of everyday Egyptians rise and declare that they want an end to President Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year rule. Time will tell if Mubarak’s regime really will collapse or be forced to undertake major reforms, but what is true is there are lessons for China's leaders as well as those through the Middle East.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Friday's Squawk on the Street.

  • An anti-government protestor holds a blooded Egyptian flag in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt.

    The Obama administration is discussing with Egyptian officials a proposal for President Hosni Mubarak to resign immediately, turning over power to a transitional government headed by Vice President Omar Suleiman. The NYT reports.

  • Protestors chant as they ride on an army tank transporter in Tahrir Square on January 29, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt. Tens of thousands of demonstrators have taken to the streets across Egypt in Cairo, Suez, and Alexandria to call for the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak. Riot police and the Army have been sent into the streets to quell the protests, which so far have claimed 32 lives and left more than a thousand injured.

    As violence has broken out in Egypt, concern has turned to the risk of the blocking of the Suez Canal or nearby pipelines, which could pose a threat to world energy supplies, the New York Times reports.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Tuesday's Squawk on the Street.

  • As the seventh day of protests continue in Egypt, business is at a standstill, tourists and foreign students are abandoning the country and Cairo is at the mercy of vigilantes, CNBC reports.

  • The Egyptian stock market will likely tumble another 10 percent before investors put some cash in and try to stage a rally, after which the benchmark index could regain a third of its losses, according to historical trends, Robin Griffiths, technical strategist at Cazenove Capital, told CNBC Monday.

  • Trade

    Though the US-China relationship often dominates the geopolitical trade debate, Beijing is now the top trading partner for Japan, Australia and South Africa, as well as South Korea, Hong Kong and Taiwan.

  • Skyline from Dhow Harbour in Qatar.

    Political instability  and business corruption make these markets risky, but they have a place in the portfolios of investors looking for explosive growth.

  • container_ships_200.jpg

    Despite an international effort to ensure safe passage through the world’s most treacherous waters, pirates escalated their attacks in 2010 for the fourth straight year, striking more ships and taking more hostages last year than in any year on record, according to an annual report on piracy, the New York Times reports.

  • Emerging equity markets were amongst the top performers in 2010 and Mark Mobius, executive chairman at Templeton Emerging Markets Group, expects the trend to continue this year. The global investor remains heavily exposed to the sector.

  • A year ago, almost no one knew a rare earth element from a rare coin. Today, rare earths are a global story—and a global investment opportunity.