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Leadership Corporate Leaders

  • The new Ford Flex is displayed at the New York International Auto Show in New York, Wednesday, April 4, 2007.  The show opens to the public on April 6, 2007.  (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    There’s a lot on the line for General Motors, Ford and DaimlerChrysler at the New York International Auto Show.  CNBC’s Phil LeBeau talks to some of the automakers’ top executives top about meeting consumers needs for style, versatility and affordability.

  • Citigroup said on Thursday Damian Kozlowski, chief executive of its private banking unit, is leaving the company, in the latest management change at the largest U.S. bank.

  • The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice have summoned the chief executive of French energy giant Total to explain the group's activities in Iran, a French newspaper said on Tuesday.

  • Peter Scaturro, chief executive of U.S. Trust, won't join Bank of America when the second-largest U.S. bank acquires the private banking arm of Charles Schwab for $3.3 billion.

  • As the Supreme Court set the stage for stricter environmental regulation this week, energy giant Dynegy bought out LS Power Group for $4 billion. The company’s Chairman and CEO Bruce Williamson shared insights on “Closing Bell.”

  • The median pay for chief executive officers in 2006 rose 9.3% from the prior year, marking the second consecutive year of slowed compensation growth, according to a preliminary survey of CEO compensation released on Monday.

  • Steve Ballmer on the Wall of Shame? Could Cramer do that to a longtime friend? That and more in today's Mad Mail segment.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Cowan, who was also named a director, replaces Max Carnecchia, who held the post for the past year and will continue as president.

  • GRAND THEFT AUTO

    It’s day one for Take-Two Interactive’s new management team. The one who led the shareholder revolt is the new chairman, Strauss Zelnick, who is also a founding partner of ZelnickMedia. Zelnick joined CNBC's Melissa Lee on "Street Signs" Friday afternoon, to talk about the new team at Take-Two.

  • Dell

    Shares of Dell opened lower Friday after news that its internal audit found evidence of potential financial misconduct and accounting irregularities. Some have voiced concern that this investigation could focus on founder, chairman and CEO Michael Dell himself. Roger Kay, president and founder of Endpoint Technologies, and Tom Gardner, CEO of The Motley Fool, joined "Morning Call" to debate the impact.

  • Rep. Charles Boustany

    Home Depot slowed its store growth in 2006, according to a federal filing on Thursday. The filing also gave details of the $210 million severance package for former CEO Robert Nardelli, who left in January.

  • All week Cramer has been highlighting retail managers that deserve the benefit of the doubt when the numbers take a dip. For this segment he puts the focus on a couple of executives who keep those managers looking good.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Here are a few more names from Cramer’s "Benefit of the Doubt" list of retail CEOs who deserve your patience and understanding.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Frustrated by a bruising, and so far unsuccessful battle to open its first discount store in New York City, Wal-Mart Stores chief executive said, "I don't care if we are ever here."

  • News that Glenn Tilton, chief executive of UAL, earned $39.7 million in 2006 drew an angry protest from workers at UAL's United Airlines on Tuesday, with unions demanding their "fair share."

  • Joel Hollander stepped down as Chief Executive Officer of CBS Radio after more than two years of service. Hollander joined the company in 2003 as President and Chief Operating Officer. He will be succeeded by Dan Mason. 

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    Not quite. Cramer says there are times when trust will make you more money than doubt.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Stockman was the former chairman and CEO of Michigan-based Collins & Aikman, which makes auto parts. He served as budget director under President Reagan.

  • "Last week was a magical week for us," Freeport McMoRan CEO Richard Adkerson said on "Squawk Box." The New Orleans mining giant closed on its acquisition of Phoenix-base Phelps Dodge for $26 billion, then boosted a planned stock offering to help cut some of the $17.5 billion debt it took on for the deal.

  • Apple’s Co-Founder and Chief Executive Steve Jobs is the “ultimate CEO who matters,” according to a ranking by Barron’s magazine.  The annual ranking of top CEOs from around the world seeks to identify the corporate leaders who have top-notch reputations in the financial community and would be missed by investors if they unexpectedly left their jobs.