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Business Events Corporate Restructuring

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    While derivatives themselves carry risks and financial scandals have tarnished their image, many companies still use futures contracts, swaps, collars, and other hedging instruments to minimize volatility in their cost of doing business.

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    As business struggle for profits in a uneven economy, many are turning to outside consultants to stay alive and  boost their bottom lines.

  • Hewlett-Packard's Next Move

    Discussing whether HP's restructuring plan was a mistake and how the company plans to grow its business, with Todd Bradley, Hewlett-Packard Personal Systems Group.

  • HP Trying to Become Big Blue?

    Debating whether Hewlett-Packard's PC biz spin off and Autonomy acquisition will position it to become the next IBM, with Crawford Del Prete, IDC executive vice president.

  • The former Greek Prime Minister, George Papandreou

    The list of corporate restructurings needed during the credit crisis already resembles "War and Peace" in length. Now, entire countries such as Greece seem to need restructuring. What are the main differences between restructuring a country and a company? And how can the hapless politicians and central bankers attempting to make struggling economies work learn from corporate restructuring?

  • Stop Trading: Cramer on Cisco

    CNBC's Jim Cramer weighs in on Cisco's CEO and it's restructuring plan.

  • AT&T's Chief Financial Officer Rick Lindner will be retiring on June 1, 2011, according to a press release by the company.

  • Gm Building

    How long it takes for the government to divest its holdings in General Motors will, in part, be determined by the company’s success, G.M.’s chief executive said. The New York Times reports.

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    Judging by Thursday's share price performance, RBS has delivered all that has been asked of it. The bank's loss wasn't anything like as bad as analysts had expected, non-performing loans have peaked and the core operations (the bits it's going to hang on to) were profitable.

  • Sam's Club

    Sam's Club, the warehouse club division of Wal-Mart Stores is cutting roughly 11,200 jobs, or about 10 percent of its workforce, as it outsources in-store product demonstrations and eliminates positions used to recruit new business members.

  • Workers of AB InBev stand on a picket line as they strike outside the InBev Brewery in Leuven, Belgium.

    Belgian beer lovers hoping to forget the economic slowdown and freezing weather over a few pints of their favorite brew may be in for a shock, UK newspaper the Telegraph reported.

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    For all its financial troubles and shortcomings as an automaker, no aspect of G.M. has confounded its critics as much as its hidebound, command-and-control corporate culture. The New York Times looks at the carmaker's effort to change.

  • Smart investments lie in those companies that are boosting market share, creating healthy balance sheets, and taking advantage of price leadership, according to Javelin Wealth Management CEO Stephen Davies.

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    Carry your own luggage to the plane, slide one pound ($1.65) into a slot to use the toilet while airborne, pay more charges for fuel, have staff working for free for one month.

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    Savvy consumers swarmed to London's Regent Park Thursday for the opening of Taste of London's four-day gourmet food festival. The event was teaming with cost-conscious foodies getting a chance to taste the wares of Michelin-starred chefs for a fraction of the price.

  • General Motors will announce the members of its new board of directors  "very shortly," CEO Fritz Henderson told CNBC Monday.

  • Stocks flopped Friday, capping a dismal week, as bank stocks pulled back after recent gains.

  • Stocks opened flat Friday as investors were encouraged by a pair of better-than-expected manufacturing readings but dismal economic data out of Europe and weak U.S. retail reports capped gains.

  • Futures pared losses Friday after a pair of better-than-expected manufacturing readings.