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Weather Earthquakes

  • A tsunami warning is in effect for parts of the Aleutian Islands of Alaska after a 7.1-magnitude earthquake was recorded in the ocean.

  • A fallen tree which also knocked over a power line is seen on Loughboro Road after Hurricane Irene swept through the area.

    Hurricane Irene was the 'Perfect Storm' for insurers in a different sense of the cliche. The weakened storm that spared New York city from major damage gave the wealthy and rarely hit Northeast enough of a scare because of ominous weather forecasts leading up the storm that property insurers will be able to raise pricing even more next year, according to a Morgan Stanley analyst.

  • CNBC.com Market Outlook

    The week's top business and investment news, including Hurricane Irene and banking plays.

  • Earthquake Rattles U.S. East Coast

    People are still buzzing about the strong earthquake that rattled the East coast yesterday. CNBC's Hampton Pearson has the details on the damages caused and the safety procedures following the quake.

  • A 5.9 magnitude earthquake centered northwest of Richmond, Va., shook much of Washington, D.C., and was felt as far north as Rhode Island, New York City and Martha's Vineyard, Mass., where President Barack Obama is vacationing. The U.S. Geological Survey said the earthquake was half a mile deep. Shaking was felt at the White House and all over the East Coast, as far south as Chapel Hill, N.C. Parts of the Pentagon, White House and Capitol were evacuated. There were no immediate reports of injuri

    A 5.8 magnitude earthquake centered northwest of Richmond, Va., shook much of Washington, D.C. Click for scenes from the moments following the earthquake.

  • Markets Reaction to Earthquake

    The CNBC news team reports on today's 5.9 magnitude earthquake and its impact on the markets, with Ira Epstein, The Linn Group, and Mark Zoback, Stanford University geologist, Rowena Lohman, Cornell Univerisity, and Kate Hutton, Caltech seismologist weigh in on the probability of earthquakes and aftershocks on the East coast.

  • Crowds are evacuated from buildings on Wall Street in New York City after the 5.9 earthquake shook the East Coast of the United States.

    Offices throughout Manhattan were rocked by the 6.0 earthquake today.

  • NYSE: No Impact After 5.9 Earthquake

    CNBC's Bob Pisani reports all systems are operating normally on the floor of the NYSE after a 5.9 magnitude earthquake hits Virginia, sending tremors across the Eastern Seaboard and as far west as Ohio and Michigan.

  • Investors pass by an electric board showing the figure of Nikkei stock average in Tokyo, Japan.

    The post-tsunami recovery of the Japanese economy is being hampered by the strong yen and the country needs a more concerted effort to get nuclear power stations up and running again, analysts told CNBC Monday.

  • Japan Politics an Obstacle for Tsunami Survivors

    Rikuzen Takata, a seaside town in Japan's northeastern prefecture of Iwate, was one of the hardest hit communities after the March 11 tragedy. Survivors say the political gridlock in Tokyo is starving them of money they need to rebuild. CNBC's Kaori Enjoji reports.

  • The Japanese people are fighting hard to get the economy out of the slump that has followed the devastating earthquake and tsunami that blasted parts of the island nation in March, a Nomura analyst told CNBC Monday.

  • The Bank of Japan kept monetary policy steady on Friday in a sign that a first-quarter economic slump did not change the central bank's view that growth will pick up late this year when the wounds from the devastating earthquake begin to heal.

  • People march on the street during an anti nuclear demonstration in Tokyo on June 11, 2011.

    The odd looking goya has long been a popular ingredient in Japanese cuisine, but a Tokyo restaurant chain is now growing the courgette-shaped bitter melon to create “green curtains” outside the windows of several hundred of its eateries. The FT reports.

  • Mitsubishi's electric vehicle i-miev have been used in the wrecked cities in northeastern Japan not because of any special ability to claw their way over mountains of debris, but because they were able to “refuel” at common electrical outlets.

    Mitsubishi Motors said on Monday annual operating profit would rise by a better-than-expected 25 percent on a rapid rebound in production and sales after the March 11 earthquake

  • Fukushima nuclear power plant shown on March 15, 2011 following earthquake and tsunami, Japan, Tokyo Electric Power Co.

    Despite the dangers at Fukushima, laborers from across Japan are traveling to the plant in search of work during the country’s harsh economic downturn.  The NYT reports.

  • Exhaust plumes from cooling towers are seen at the Jaenschwalde lignite coal-fired power station in Janschwalde, Germany.

    European gas suppliers could see a boost from Germany's decision to phase out nuclear energy, with other countries set to follow Berlin's lead, Per Lekander, head of utilities research at UBS, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Employees of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant walk outside of the destroyed 4th block of the plant on February 24, 2011 ahead of the 25th anniversary of the meltdown of reactor number four due to be marked on April 26, 2011. Ukraine said early this year it will lift restrictions on tourism around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, formally opening the scene of the world's worst nuclear accident to visitors. Chernobyl's number-four reactor, in what was then the Soviet Union and now Ukraine, expl

    Nuclear safety watchdogs and G20 energy ministers gathering in Paris on Tuesday and Wednesday to work on reinforcing nuclear safety around the globe in the wake of the Japanese nuclear disaster at Fukushima last March were keen to stress nuclear energy is still a viable source of alternative energy.

  • Nuclear Power Plant

    China’s freeze on new nuclear projects could last until the beginning of 2012, according to a senior industry official, underlining the gravity of China’s nuclear safety review. The FT reports.

  • Steering wheel

    Raised debt ceiling rejected, May auto sales slumped and the LinkedInIPO emulated. Here's what we're watching...

  • Beijing, China

    The question now is how much economic growth may slow, before the authorities shift from controlling inflation to revving the growth engine. The NYT reports.