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Weather Earthquakes

  • The Bank of Japan kept monetary policy steady on Friday in a sign that a first-quarter economic slump did not change the central bank's view that growth will pick up late this year when the wounds from the devastating earthquake begin to heal.

  • People march on the street during an anti nuclear demonstration in Tokyo on June 11, 2011.

    The odd looking goya has long been a popular ingredient in Japanese cuisine, but a Tokyo restaurant chain is now growing the courgette-shaped bitter melon to create “green curtains” outside the windows of several hundred of its eateries. The FT reports.

  • Mitsubishi's electric vehicle i-miev have been used in the wrecked cities in northeastern Japan not because of any special ability to claw their way over mountains of debris, but because they were able to “refuel” at common electrical outlets.

    Mitsubishi Motors said on Monday annual operating profit would rise by a better-than-expected 25 percent on a rapid rebound in production and sales after the March 11 earthquake

  • Fukushima nuclear power plant shown on March 15, 2011 following earthquake and tsunami, Japan, Tokyo Electric Power Co.

    Despite the dangers at Fukushima, laborers from across Japan are traveling to the plant in search of work during the country’s harsh economic downturn.  The NYT reports.

  • Exhaust plumes from cooling towers are seen at the Jaenschwalde lignite coal-fired power station in Janschwalde, Germany.

    European gas suppliers could see a boost from Germany's decision to phase out nuclear energy, with other countries set to follow Berlin's lead, Per Lekander, head of utilities research at UBS, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Employees of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant walk outside of the destroyed 4th block of the plant on February 24, 2011 ahead of the 25th anniversary of the meltdown of reactor number four due to be marked on April 26, 2011. Ukraine said early this year it will lift restrictions on tourism around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, formally opening the scene of the world's worst nuclear accident to visitors. Chernobyl's number-four reactor, in what was then the Soviet Union and now Ukraine, expl

    Nuclear safety watchdogs and G20 energy ministers gathering in Paris on Tuesday and Wednesday to work on reinforcing nuclear safety around the globe in the wake of the Japanese nuclear disaster at Fukushima last March were keen to stress nuclear energy is still a viable source of alternative energy.

  • Nuclear Power Plant

    China’s freeze on new nuclear projects could last until the beginning of 2012, according to a senior industry official, underlining the gravity of China’s nuclear safety review. The FT reports.

  • Steering wheel

    Raised debt ceiling rejected, May auto sales slumped and the LinkedInIPO emulated. Here's what we're watching...

  • Beijing, China

    The question now is how much economic growth may slow, before the authorities shift from controlling inflation to revving the growth engine. The NYT reports.

  • April's durable goods orders were much weaker than expected, but the markets are finding a silver lining in positive revisions to March numbers.

  • The "Mad Money" host reveals which stock goes on the "Sell Block" while the other remains a "buy, buy, buy."

  • Titanic

    Even the most intellectually gifted prognosticators did not foresee key forces that would cause paradigm shifts in society.

  • Picture shows the fuel assembly storage basin inside the reactor building at a Nuclear Power Plant near Landshut, Germany.

    Vents that American officials said would prevent devastating explosions at nuclear plants in the United States were put to the test in Japan and failed, the NYT reports.

  • A man and his sister stand before their broken house, destroyed by the tsunami at Rikuzentakata in Iwate prefecture on March 17, 2011.

    The global surge in energy and commodity prices had a bigger financial impact on developing Asia’s big companies in the first quarter than Japan’s devastating earthquake and tsunami, results and trading updates suggest. The Financial Times reports.

  • Soldiers pull a boat across floodwater as they help to evacuate residents of Tagajo city, Miyagi

    Across Japan, there is a shared realization that the natural and nuclear disasters unleashed on March 11 have exposed the fragility of its postwar economic order — and that a recovery will not be a return to the status quo, the NYT reports.

  • Two earthquakes struck southeast Spain in quick succession Wednesday, killing at least 10 people, injuring dozens and causing major damage to buildings, officials said.

  • italy_rome_200.jpg

    More than 22 earthquakes struck Italy by noon on Wednesday, as is normal for the quake-prone country. But none was the devastating temblor purportedly predicted by a now-dead scientist to strike Rome.

  • AIG

    A pair of TARP pariahs meet shareholders, a pair of big-cap companies report tough quarters and a pair of would-be wed wireless names face scrutiny. Here's what we're watching.

  • Nuclear Site Locater

    Since the March earthquake and tsunami hit that Japan, there’s been no shortage of new apps designed to help users prepare for, deal with and even recover from a disaster.

  • Residents travel on the opened road in front of the 4,724-tonne freighter "M.V. Asia Symphony", grounded by the recent tsunami in Kamaishi, Iwate prefecture on May 6, 2011.

    With oil refineries out of commission and clogged roads slowing gasoline deliveries, Japan turned to electric cars to help provide needed services after the earthquake and tsunami in March. The New York  Times reports.