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Central Banks European Central Bank

  • Barclays Fallout Update

    CNBC's Kelly Evans reports the latest details on the departure of Barclays CEO Bob Diamond, amid the developing Libor scandal. Anton Schutz, Mendon Capital Advisors president & CIO, offers insight.

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    Expect heated discussions around some July 4th barbeques in the US - not just on the economy, elections and last week's Supreme Court ruling, but also on the follow-through to Friday's impressive surge in equity markets around the world.

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    Australia holds steady on rates, and the euro and dollar dip — it's time for your FX Fix.

  • Mario Draghi

    The spotlight in the European debt crisis has now shifted decisively toward the influential leader of the European Central Bank, Mario Draghi, who emerged from the recent summit meeting in Brussels with new powers and stronger backing to address the Continent’s financial woes. The New York Times reports.

  • Customer at an auto dealership.

    The auto industry has been one of the positives in this shaky economy but will it last? Traders will be watching June auto sales on Tuesday—especially after a weak ISM reading.

  • ISM Cools Stock Rally

    After stocks rallied big time on last week's European Summit, markets took a hit in today's session on weak manufacturing data before recovering. Donald Luskin of Trend Macro and David Goldman of Macro-Strategy, weigh in.

  • Checking Up on Greece

    The "troika" of international lenders is set to convene in Greece on Thursday to assess the country's bailout process. Amelia Bourdeau, Westpac, offers insight.

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    The euro got quite a lift from the European Union summit, but this strategist says the party's over.

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    With Friday’s employment report looming, a surprise contraction in manufacturing activity in June raises the specter that the current economic soft patch may lead to something more dire.

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    Ready for another employment report? This strategist has a trading plan.

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    Summit euphoria ebbs and central bank confabs await — it's time for your FX Fix.

  • A detailed view of the prototype design of the new golden Olympic torch during its unveiling at St Pancras Station on June 8, 2011 in London, England. 8,000 torchbearers will carry the Olympic Flame around the UK during the 70-day relay, which starts at Land's End in Cornwall on May 19, 2012.

    As London braces itself for feared transport congestion when the Olympic Games start this month, the disruption looks set to hit an unexpected victim: the government bond market, the Financial Times reports.

  • ESM's Firepower Is Insufficient

    Steve Brice, Chief Investment Strategist, Standard Chartered says the deal with Spain and Italy at the EU summit is "good" but not a game-changer. Markets are now looking for aggressive action from the ECB.

  • ECB's Supervisory Role Most Immediate Need

    Timothy Riddell, Head of Global Markets Research for Asia at ANZ, says it is important that Europe needs a region-wide banking supervisory body before the changes to the ESM are allowed.

  • NYSE trader

    The beach may be beckoning this Fourth of July week but traders are going to want to be at their desks for the start of the third quarter, with the jobs report, an ECB rate decision—and more.

  • European Central Bank

    With the European Union summit behind us, investors are focusing on what the European Central Bank will do next.

  • From EU to ECB

    Discussing whether you should buy the euro into next week's ECB meeting, with CNBC's Melissa Lee and the Money in Motion traders. Featuring Richard Ross, global technical analyst, Auerbach Grayson.

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    The euro is having a big day on the heels of the summit agreement - but this strategist is wary.

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    Summit progress lifts the euro and the Bank of England talks tough — it's time for your FX Fix.

  • Spain

    Euro zone leaders agreed to radically restructure Spain’s 100 bilion euros ($125.9 billion) bank recapitalisation plan, allowing EU bailout funds to eventually be injected directly into teetering Spanish financial institutions, meaning Madrid can sweep the burden of the bailouts off its sovereign books.