Economic Measures Inflation

  • U.S. worker productivity rose at the strongest pace in four years in the third quarter, pushing labor costs down, the government said Wednesday in a report offering comfort to the inflation-wary Federal Reserve. 

  • The risks posed by the credit market turmoil and inflation were about balanced, and there was some improvement in inflation, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond President Jeffrey Lacker said on Wednesday.

  • Australia's central bank raised interest rates to an 11-year high on Wednesday as it battled to contain inflation, a decision charged with unusual political implications just two weeks before a national election.

  • Ben Bernanke

    It's been less than a week since the Federal Reserve hinted it was done lowering interest rates. Yet Wall Street is already clamoring for yet another cut.

  • Heating Oil Delivery Truck

    Higher crude oil prices will force consumers to dig even deeper into their pockets to pay this winter's heating bills, as costs for heating oil, natural gas and propane will be more than previously expected.

  • James Owens, the chief executive of Dow component Caterpillar, sees a soft landing in store for the U.S. economy.

  • Ben Bernanke

    Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke may not have many soothing words for Wall Street when he testifies before Congress on Thursday.

  • Billionaire investor George Soros forecast on Monday that the U.S. economy is "on the verge of a very serious economic correction" after decades of overspending.

  • On his last day as chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, Alan Greenspan smiles as he presides over his final Federal Open Market Committee meeting at the the Fed's headquarters in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2006. He is speaking to Deborah J. Danker, at left, special assistant to the board, with Vice Chairman Roger W. Ferguson Jr., at right. Greenspan has held the post for more than 18 years and is widely viewed as the most successful chairman in the Fed's 92-year h

    Former Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan said on Tuesday that falling U.S. home prices and high inventories of unsold properties presented a major risk to the U.S. economy and financial markets.

  • A home is advertised for sale at a foreclosure auction in Pasadena, California.

    The rate of foreclosures in the United States will remain higher than normal for the next18 months as the current home loan crisis plays itself out, a senior U.S. Treasury official said Friday.

  • Help Wanted Sign

    After Thursday's huge selloff in the stock market, investors are now turning their attention to the October jobs report.

  • Fast-rising oil, steel and coal prices are adding to inflationary pressure in China, the country's top economic planning agency said on Friday.

  • traders5.jpg

    If the Fed isn't going to cut  rates any more, that means bad news really is ... bad news. And with continuing concerns about the financial sector and oil prices, there is plenty of bad news.

  • Clean energy stocks worldwide, and especially solar, have roared upwards in the past 10 weeks following the latest spiral in oil prices -- but proving a direct link with oil is elusive, analysts say.

  • The Federal Reserve pumped $41 billion into the U.S. financial system Thursday, one of its largest cash infusions to help companies get through a credit crunch that took a turn for the worse in August.

  • Shoppers in a toy aisle at a Target store.

    The mighty U.S. consumer may be starting to crack, just as the Federal Reserve signaled that it was through with interest rate cuts barring a sharper economic downturn.

  • The number of U.S. workers filing new claims for jobless aid fell by a more-than-expected 6,000 last week, government data on Thursday showed, while the four-week moving average of claims edged up to a six-month high.

  • Planned U.S. layoffs fell 12 percent in October on a reduction in the number of announced firings in the financial and housing-related sectors, an independent report showed Wednesday.

  • China unexpectedly raised domestic gasoline and diesel prices by a tenth on Thursday, the first increase in 17 months, as officials rushed to tame a worsening supply crisis by easing losses at state refiners.

  • Australian retail sales easily outpaced expectations in September, setting the seal on a very strong quarter for consumption and adding to an already compelling case for a further rise ininterest rates.