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MultiVu Video Feed: NEW RATINGS OF CHILDREN'S BOOSTER SEATS: MOST IMPROVE, EARNING TOP RATING FROM INSURANCE INSTITUTE FOR HIGHWAY SAFETY

SATELLITE FEEDS:

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

10:30 AM - 11:00 AM ET

1:30 PM - 2:00 PM ET

Galaxy 17

Galaxy 17

Transponder 13 - Slot 4

Transponder 13 - Slot 4

KU-Band

KU-Band

Downlink Freq: 11963 Horizontal

Downlink Freq: 11963 Horizontal

Bandwidth 6 MHz

Bandwidth 6 MHz

Symbol Rate: 3.9787

Symbol Rate: 3.9787

Data Rate: 5.4999

Data Rate: 5.4999

FEC: 3/4

FEC: 3/4

NEWS: Boosters improve: Most new seats provide good belt fit; Two Safety 1st models are not recommended as boosters

FORMAT: B-roll and Soundbites

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES: Video, hard copy requests, downloadable High Def MPEG4, contact information and more available at http://multivu.prnewswire.com/broadcast/58795/press.html

STORY SUMMARY:
Fifteen of 17 booster seats introduced in 2012 earn the top rating of BEST BET from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, evidence that more than ever, manufacturers are designing seats to provide good safety belt fit for booster-age children.

The improvements mean that BEST BET boosters now outnumber seats in any of the three other categories for the first time since the Institute released its inaugural booster ratings in 2008. Boosters are supposed to improve how adult lap and shoulder belts fit children so the belts can properly restrain them in crashes. BEST BET boosters correctly position belts on a typical 4-to-8-year-old child in almost any car, minivan or SUV.

Two boosters are not recommended because they don't provide proper belt fit, and consumers are advised to avoid them. The Safety 1st All-in-One and Safety 1st Alpha Omega Elite, both made by Dorel Juvenile Group Inc., are older designs first evaluated in 2009. These models are 3-in-1s that can be used as rear-facing and forward-facing child restraints with a built-in harness. They can be converted to boosters by removing the harness and using lap and shoulder belts to restrain a child. Although these seats should work well as child restraints, they aren't the best option for boosters because they leave the lap belt too high on the abdomen and the shoulder belt too far out on the shoulder. Four other boosters on last year's not recommended list have been discontinued by Evenflo Company Inc.

For more information, go to www.iihs.org.

SOUNDBITES:

  • Anne McCartt, senior vice president, research, Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

B-ROLL INCLUDES: B-roll of boosters being evaluated and other related footage, crash demonstration footage

VIDEO PROVIDED BY: Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

FOR STORY INFO, CONTACT: Russ Rader, (703) 247-1500
FOR TECHNICAL INFORMATION OR HARD COPY, PLEASE CALL:
MultiVu Media Relations, 800-653-5313 EXT. 3

/PRNewswire -- Oct. 25, 2012/

SOURCE Insurance Institute for Highway Safety