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CCTV Script 27/05/13

This is the script of CNBC's news report for China's CCTV on May 27, Monday.

Welcome to the CNBC Business Daily.

India's Prime Minister Manmohan Singh is in Japan today for a 4-day visit.

Singh and his Japanese counterpart, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, are expected to make a new joint push on nuclear energy. Tokyo is trying to boost atomic technology exports to help revive its economy.

While Singh is hoping to reach a deal, Japan faces stiff opposition at home when it comes to exporting nuclear technology. Much of the negotiations have been stalled since the Fukishima nuclear disaster more than two years ago.

So, could a potential nuclear deal hurt Prime Minister Abe's approval ratings? Here are some expert views.

[Sound on tape by Stephen Nagy, Assistant Professor, Department of Japanese Studies at The Chinese University of Hong Kong: In terms of exporting nuclear technology, I think that exporting safe nuclear technology is something that the public may support. What they would like to see is abolition of any kind of nuclear technology especially in the mid-long term. So they are somewhat incompatible if they want to get their economy growing, they want to sell their technology, they want to have a stronger relationship with India, so they will obviously have to engage in some kind of technological transfer. ]

[Sound on tape by Colin Chapman, Australian Institute Of International Affairs, NSW, President: The problem there is that I think Mr Singh, is not going to be quite as fast as signing up on this as maybe Mr Abe would like him to. However I think the stage is definitely set for some kind of overall agreement.]

According to the Wall Street Journal, signing of a bilateral trade pact in 2011, sparked a 35 percent jump in Japanese exports to India.

As hopes grow for Abenomics to put Japan on a new economic trajectory, how will that affect the East Asian nation's trade ties with India?

This is what our panel of experts had to say.

[Sound on tape by Colin Chapman, Australian Institute Of International Affairs, NSW, President: Mr Abe is on fire, if I can put it that way, he really want to move fast, time is not on his hands, he's keen to make an impression.]

[Sound on tape by Stephen Nagy, Assistant Professor, Department of Japanese Studies at The Chinese University of Hong Kong: India is a capital poor market and technological poor market. So Japan fits that profile in terms of an investor. Japan can invest in FDI in the Indian market and help build the economy, can also invest in technology. This is something that the Indians desperately need, in terms of being strong competitors with their northern competitor, China.]

Chloe Cho, from CNBC's Asia headquarters.