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Stocks Exxon Mobil Corp

  • Signs of an improving domestic economy helped send stocks higher for the second day on Thursday. How should investors be positioned? Steven Stahler, president of Stahler Investment Group and Alan Lancz, president of Alan B. Lancz & Associates shared their insights.

  • Stocks advanced Thursday, with the Dow up nearly 100 points, as fears of contagion from the European debt crisis eased and U.S. jobless claims fell.

  • Europe is up, as are U.S. stocks, on hope that the EU will complete talks with Greece on a financial aid package that could be announced this weekend.

  • Traders at the New York Stock Exchange.

    The weekly jobless claims report should help swing the focus back to the U.S. economic recovery at least temporarily Thursday, after the Fed affirmed low rates are here to stay for the time being.

  • Dividend increases keep coming. ExxonMobil the latest, this time increasing their annual dividend to $1.76 from $1.68. According to Standard & Poor's, 98 companies in the S&P 500 (20 percent!) have increased, with 2 decreasing.

  • Debtor Nations

    Stocks ended higher after the Fed left interest rates unchanged and kept the "extended period" language in its statement. Financials were the day's best performers, with JPMorgan and Bank of America leading the Dow.

  • Cramer makes the call on viewers' favorite stocks.

  • Stocks opened lower on Tuesday amid jitters about the Federal Reserve's two-day policy meeting. What should investors expect going forward? Joseph Balestrino, senior VP, portfolio manager and fixed income market strategist at Federated Investors, shared his insights.

  • The Dow erased nearly all of its gains Monday, dragged down by the financial sector amid worries about financial reform. Caterpillar led the Dow's gainers, up more than 4 percent.

  • The Dow remained higher in mid-afternoon Monday amid a flurry of new M&A activity and an earnings beat from Caterpillar.  But there was some weakness in the energy, banking and health-care sectors, which dragged on the S&P and Nasdaq.

  • “We’ve been steadily moving our clients’ money into dividend payers this year,” says Patty Edwards of Storehouse. Find out 3 of her favorites!

  • The NASDAQ Composite and Dow rose for the eighth consecutive week, with the Dow marking its longest winning streak since January 2004. Energy and consumer discretionary stocks led the gains in the S&P 500 this week. 

  • With chatter suggesting the Fed is turning more hawkish, and a slew of underperforming stocks reporting earnings, how should you place your bets next week?

  • Businesses, investors, governments and consumers are being inundated with complex and conflicting data about climate change and the efforts to address it.So what parts of this new economic paradigm will fundamentally change your life, finances and workplace? It's something CNBC contributor Terry Tamminen addresses in his upcoming book, "Cracking the Carbon Code: The Keys to Sustainable Wealth in the 21st Century."  In the book, Tamminen examines how companies are dealing with their carbon footpr

    Businesses, investors, governments and consumers are being inundated with data about climate change. See some of the potential winners and losers in the new age of carbon awareness.

  • Here's our Fast Money Final Trade. Our gang gives you tomorrow's best trades, right now!

  • Dow loses a bit of steam midday due to financials. The Dow has lost about 50 points in the past half hour (as of this writing) due to weakness in its financial components. This is likely due to concern that regulatory reform is looking increasingly real.

  • Dividend stocks are slowly making a comeback, so which ones should investors watch for? Michael Farr, president of Farr, Miller & Washington and CNBC contributor, and Jeffrey Kosnett, senior editor at Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, shared their best plays.

  • Stocks ended higher Tuesday, led by energy and financials. But IBM and Goldman Sachs declined.

  • As the SEC's fraud accusation against Goldman Sachs unfolds, some investors are more confused than ever. But Kelly Campbell, chief investment officer of fixed income at Campbell Wealth Management and Jeff Hussey of Russell Investment Group still see "great things" in the current market—if you shop carefully.

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    While corn ethanol dominates the current biofuel market, the future of clean liquid-energy looks more likely to be found floating on ponds than growing in fields.  "It algae has the potential to revolutionize the field of biofuels," says one analyst.