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Stocks Bank of America Corp

  • Catepillar

    The S&P is sitting right at its highest levels since November.  The central thesis is earnings:  P/E multiples will expand in the next several quarters due to the combination of cost cutting and gradually rising revenues.

  • Foreclosure

    Both government and industry have experienced a steep learning curve in battling foreclosures, but two years into the crisis, greater flexibility and more effective measures are combining to produce early signs of improved results.

  • There's not much economic news this week. Leading Economic Indicators will be reported Monday and if it's a gain (which it should be) it will be the third gain in a row. That would be good. Thursday will see existing home sales reported and they should come in at an annual rate of about 5 million. Thursday the Treasury will announce next week's bond auctions and you can expect 2 year notes and 5 and 7 year bonds totaling over $100 billion dollars.

  • As of this past Friday, just over 10% of the S&P 500 companies had reported earnings. This week we will see roughly 30% more of the S&P report.  Here's a look at which companies have had the biggest surprises so far...

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    So far, earnings this quarter have painted a mixed picture, some good some bad, but they're far from the disaster some had feared.

  • NYSE_trader_worried3_200.jpg

    Earnings season has put some luster back in the stock market, but it may have a tougher time scoring gains in the week ahead.

  • Though the S&P 500 and Dow ended Friday little changed, the move for the week was anything but small with both indexes holding onto enormous rallies.

  • The Dow turned lower again in late morning trading as investors continued to digest earnings reports from a slew of top-tier companies.

  • On the Halftime Report, Patty Edwards of Storehouse erroneously said that Dillard's had exposure to CIT. She has since been told by the company and verified via the 10-K that she was, infact, incorrect in that statement.

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    The Dow turned lower in late morning trading as investors continued to digest earnings reports from a slew of top-tier companies. After turning positive mid-morning, the blue-chip average slipped back into negative territory, joining the two other major indexes. An economic report showing an unexpected rise in new housing starts and building permits helped stoke some enthusiasm. Wall Street will attempt to make it a perfect week for the bulls—with the Dow, the S&P 500 and the Nasdaq rising in all four trading days so far this week. Read and listen to what the experts had to say...

  • The quarterly reports for the big banks were terrible across the board, but stocks are up because the psychology and the method of valuing bank stocks have changed, said Richard Bove, financial strategist at Rochdale Securities.

  • Late word suggests CIT Group is in talks with JPMorgan and Goldman to help them avoid bankruptcy. What are the trading implications?

  • The Dow turned lower again in late morning trading as investors continued to digest earnings reports from a slew of top-tier companies.

  • Bank of America, Citigroup and General Electric quarterly earnings and revenues are a combo platter. What does it mean for the stock market? Art Cashin, director of floor operations for UBS, offered CNBC his insights.

  • General Electric reported quarterly earnings that topped Wall Street expectations — but its 17 percent drop in revenue was worse than analysts expected. Jack De Gan, CIO of Harbor Advisory, told investors how to approach the stock.

  • Yesterday's testimony by Hank Paulson before the House Committee on Government Oversight was ostensibly billed to review the facts of last year's merger of Bank of America and Merrill Lynch. What it turned out to be - as anyone who follows the ebb and flow big crises in this town could have predicted - was the Washington equivalent of an Auto de fé.

  • Stock futures pointed to a lower opening Friday as traders took a mostly dim view of earnings from General Electric and Bank of America.

  • A massive reshuffling has left many traders wondering if days are numbered for Citi CEO Vikram Pandit. And is the future any brighter for BofA's Ken Lewis?

  • Out of work man

    Initial jobless claims fell a huge 47,000 in the week ending July 11 to 522,000....If you buy into these numbers, the long march toward big job losses and soaring unemployment may soon be coming to an end.

  • JPMorgan Chase reported 36 percent rise in quarterly profit, topping Wall Street forecasts. Meanwhile, CIT Group said it would not get government bailout funds. Art Cashin, director of floor operations for UBS, offered CNBC his insights on JPMorgan and the stock markets.