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Stocks Citigroup Inc

  • Following are the day’s biggest winners and losers. Find out why shares of Citigroup and Best Buy popped while Philip Morris and Smith & Wesson dropped.

  • Crowd of people on the street

    Drugmaker Bristol-Myers Squibb became the latest big company to announce layoffs, saying it will eliminate another 10 percent of its work force through 2010.

  • Stocks shot up Tuesday after the Federal Reserve dramatically cut interest rates.

  • Stocks shot up Tuesday after the Federal Reserve dramatically cut interest rates.

  • Stocks rose Tuesday, even after dismal reports on CPI and housing starts, as investors hope for new direction from the Federal Reserve when the central bank delivers its decision on interest rates today.

  • Welcome to Las Vegas Sign

    I'm in Las Vegas today where that panel is checking in with the public on whether TARP is having any impact. If you wanted to pick one town to provide feedback on how well the Treasury Department is gambling $330 billion (so far), why not ask Las Vegas?

  • U.S. stock index futures indicated a higher open Tuesday as investors hoped for fresh direction from the Federal Reserve along with another cut in interest rates.

  • Cramer offers hard proof that bear raiders operated unchecked in their effort to profit from the American financial system's near collapse.

  • The Fed is the big focus Tuesday, but Goldman Sachs earnings will help set the tone ahead of the open.

  • Bernard Madoff

    The list of investors who say they were duped in one of Wall Street's biggest Ponzi schemes includes some of the world's biggest banks and hedge funds, the super rich and the famous.

  • An interior view of the 2008 Cadillac CTS is shown at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2007. Whether on luxury cars or entry-level vehicles, consumers want to be delighted by an interior's extras, automotive industry executives and designers said this week at the auto show. The inside extras can run the gamut, from ambient or LED lighting to music-storing hard drives and USB ports in sound systems to pop-up navigation screens and cup holders that can heat o

    Stocks could chug higher this week, delivering that evasive Santa Claus rally, but it will all depend on whether investors are comfortable with the status of the auto-industry bailout. Plus, let's hope the Fed doesn't deliver any holiday surprises.

  • "I dread looking at Wall Street tomorrow. It's not going to be a pleasant sight." Senator Harry Reid, Thursday night. Gee, Mr. Senator, don't get into the stock commentary business.

  • Who knew reassessment based upon fact was a radical concept?

  • This week brought a slew of layoffs, including Dow component Bank of America, which said its planned job cuts may grow to 35,000 over three years after it completes its purchase of Merrill Lynch.

  • First, there's the question of how much money is really needed. The bill would have allotted $14 billion in loans, but most think the amount needed to avoid imminent bankruptcy is smaller, probably in the $5-10 billion range. This makes it doable using some combination of government guarantee and, perhaps, private lending.

  • Some days, the bad news is just plain bad. Senate's failure to reach an agreement on the auto bailout package looks set to drive markets lower Friday and that could most certainly mean a bankrupt General Motors.

  • The auto industry bailout will drive the market again Thursday as lawmakers haggle over the details of a temporary rescue plan for the big three.

  • Commentary: All of America now can rest easy: Merrill Lynch chief John Thain won’t get his $10 million bonus after all, having succumbed to browbeating calls for fiscal restraint.

  • graphic_final_trade.jpg

    Here's our Fast Money Final Trade. Our gang gives you Wednesday's best trades, right now!

  • Cramer makes the call on viewers' favorite stocks.