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Stocks The Clorox Co

  • Can Investors Clean-up with Clorox?

    Mad Money's Cramer says investors can always fall back on high-yielding dividend stocks that pay you to wait, like Clorox. Discussing the future of the company, now that it turned down Carl Icahn's $80/share bid, with Donald Knauss, Clorox CEO.

  • In chaotic and difficult market environments, Jim Cramer recommends investors seek the protection of stocks with serious dividends. After all, dividend-paying stocks pay investors to wait until the market calms and the economy improves.

    We pulled together a list of Jim Cramer's favorite dividend plays. Read on and pick one or two for your portfolio.

  • Shoppers check out at a newly-opened Target store near Royersford, Pa., on Monday, Nov. 13, 2006. Discount retailer Target Corp. said Tuesday its third-quarter profit rose 16 percent, beating analyst expectations as its sales rose 11 percent. (AP Photo/George Widman)

    When Procter & Gamble challenged Christy Prunier's name Willa for a line of skin care products for preteenagers, Prunier chose to fight. The case goes to court next month, the New York Times reports.

  • Although millions of Americans clean their houses with Clorox, ironically Carl Icahn couldn’t clean house at Clorox.

  • Clorox Tumbles

    Debating whether Carl Icahn's bid for Clorox was a realistic deal, with the Fast Money traders.

  • Stocks closed near session highs in volatile trading Monday, led by financials and energy, amid hopes for coordinated action from euro zone policymakers to contain the region's debt crisis.

  • Cramer likes this stock's 3.5 percent dividend yield.

  • Paid to Wait: CLX

    Mad Money's Cramer says in this rough market, investors need to find companies like Clorox that will pay a healthy dividend. If we really are headed for a recession, this is exactly the kind of stock that can still make investors money in a slowdown.

  • Talk about low expectations: S&P futures rose a bit on the ADP report, even though it was slightly below expectations. We are now back in the twilight zone game called Gaming the Fed: More weak data increases the chances of a third round of quantitative easing.

  • On Wednesday the traders put Clorox on the radar, with investors watching for the next move by Carl Icahn.

  • Volatility Playbook

    Volatility last week has left some scars, says Jim Iuorio, TJM Institutional Services. "People seem to be ready to tip toe back into the stock market," he says.

  • Icahn's Next Move on Clorox

    Clorox shares dropped again today as investors question whether Carl Icahn will manage to seal a deal with the company, with the Fast Money team.

  • NYSE_traders_worried8_200.jpg

    The CBOE Volatility Index (VIX), the stock market’s gauge of investors’ fears soared 35% yesterday and closed above 31 to its highest level in more than a year or since July 1, 2010. We are definitely observing some wild times on Wall St amidst new economic worries worldwide.  Here is a useful tool to help measure the volatility, and risk, of individual stocks: Beta.

  • earnings_central_badge.jpg

    U.S. futures, sideways overnight, wilted at 3 a.m. ET...about the time Europe opened.  Coincidence? I don't think so.

  • In the wake of the latest earnings report from Clorox, trader Karen Finerman can’t understand why the company isn’t embracing the offer from Carl Icahn.

  • Clorox Earnings: Latest on Icahn

    The Fast Money traders weigh in on Carl Icahn's bid for the company and its latest earnings numbers.

  • See what's happening, who's talking and what will be making headlines on Wednesday's Squawk on the Street.

  • Hedge Fund Dumps GS Shares

    CNBC's Kate Kelly has the details on Lansdowne Partners dumping Goldman Sachs shares, and a look at a slowdown in Wall Street deal-making, with Donald Drapkin, Casablanca Capital founder and chairman.

  • Word on the Street

    The major business news, including Apple shares surging, broadcom bouncing and Colorx sharedholders not buying Icahn, with the Fast Money team.

  • George Soros

    Billionaire investor George Soros, whose stock-picking career has spanned nearly four decades, said he will manage money only for himself as new regulations threaten to crimp the hedge fund industry he made famous.