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Stocks General Motors Co

  • General Motors

    Friday's bailout may have saved GM (and by association, Ford) but investors are trading these stocks as if they are headed for bankruptcy. That's because when it's all said and done, GM will have to re-structure itself as if it were in bankruptcy.

  • Stocks advanced Tuesday as the market mood got a boost from an improvement in consumer sentiment.

  • Stocks advanced Tuesday as the market mood got a boost from an improvement in consumer sentiment.

  • The Big Three

    Standard & Poor's Ratings Services and Moody's Investors Service downgraded ratings for Chrysler and Ford Motor.

  • U.S. stock index futures pointed to a higher open for Wall Street Tuesday as volumes dwindled in world markets ahead of Wednesday's shortened trading session and Thursday's Christmas holiday.

  • It sure feels like a holiday on Wall Street but without the merry making. Monday's wishy washy market ended lower and traders said they expect more of the same low volume trading Tuesday.

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    The Dow slid on Monday on more evidence the year-long recession will keep eating into corporate profits...

  • Stocks ended lower Monday as a pair of lowered outlooks arrived just in time for the holidays.

  • Drifting lower on light volume: is this what the first quarter of 2009 will look like? Stocks moved lower today, with declines accelerating midday, but a rebound in the last half hour limited the losses.

  • Monday's market is still feeling last week's pain, as lowered earnings outlooks add to the downward pressure from big bank downgrades. And forensic analysts continue to sift through the alleged Bernie Madoff fraud, asking: Can investors get anything back? But CNBC heard from experts who are anticipating an annual Santa Claus rally — and think it's crucial to buy oil stocks and other selected equities now.

  • Stocks turned lower Monday as a pair of lowered outlooks arrived just in time for the holidays.

  • The TARP plan that debuted in October was described as a way to purchase toxic assets from banks and other lenders in order to unclog the credit system, which is so essential to the efficient functioning of the economy. I supported that plan then, and I still do now.

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    Most of you are waking up this morning, hearing that Toyota has just forecast it's first annual loss in decades, and may be saying, "Wow, even Toyota is hurting." This news shouldn't come as a surprise.

  • We have been seeing volatility and volumes decline for the past two weeks. Whether this is due to the Christmas slowdown or to a genuine belief that stock volatility will be moving down in the coming months is hotly debated.

  • Mortgage rates are falling, a housing bottom looks near, oil's at $34, and GM lives to see another day.

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    The S&P 500 rose on Friday after the U.S. government said it would throw a $17.4 billion lifeline to automakers grappling with falling consumer demand.

  • The stock market ended both the day and the week essentially flat, with the twin stimuli of interest rate cuts and an automaker bailout unable to overcome a weakening economy and pessimism about the future of the banking system.

  • On Friday, stocks are holding onto modest gains. The news the government is extending $17.4 billion in loans to Chrysler and General Motors was well received at the open, but markets haven't been able to sustain those gains. Retailers are acting squirrely on concerns about weak Christmas spending, and financials are mixed after Standard & Poor's cut its outlook and ratings on 12 major banks. One thing giving traders hope: the continued slide in the VIX.

  • On Friday, the auto bailout was announced: General Motors and Chrysler will get up to $17.4 billion in short-term loans from the U.S. in return for deep concessions. Treasury boss Hank Paulson reversed himself, asking for the second half of the TARP fund. Who gets bailed out next — and where does it end? Strategists told CNBC the bailout is going to make things worse; but one airline CEO sees a healthy Darwinian process.

  • Stocks advanced Friday after Bush announced details of a rescue plan for auto makers.