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Stocks Goldman Sachs Group Inc

  • Bank

    U.S. commercial banks earned $5.2 billion trading derivatives in the second quarter, as the level of risk eased in the global market for the complex financial instruments, according to a government report released Friday.

  • Stocks tried to claw higher Friday but struggled as disappointing reports on new-home sales and durable-goods orders offset and uptick in consumer sentiment.

  • Wall Street's September rally has moved to the sidelines, at least for now, with stocks posting modest losses in each of the last two sessions.

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    Which stock do you think will hit $200 first, Goldman or Apple? Find out what the Fast Money traders have to say - then tell us what you think!

  • With a number of stocks reaching pre-Lehman levels, is the current turn lower a watershed moment for the market?

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    Paulson, Bernanke back on Capitol Hill to sell the bailout. Fed coordinates with Australian and Scandinavian central banks to keep global finance running. Goldman Sachs sells $5 billion in common shares.

  • During the height of the financial crisis, investors flocked to the safety of U.S. treasury debt and many on Wall Street are now calling the top in treasurys. So have bonds turned too risky? Kevin Giddis, managing director of Morgan Keegan and Michael Pond, strategist at Barclays Capital shared their insights.

  • Capitalism: A Love Story

    As CNBC spends the month examining the economic melt down one year ago and how far we've come, Michael Moore takes the one-year anniversary to release his new documentary, "Capitalism: A Love Story" which skewers the financial system. The documentary doesn't look at the big banks that failed, but at the people who suffered. And yes, the title is ironic: Capitalism is the bad guy.

  • Warren Buffett and Goldman Sachs: Golden Anniversary

    It's 12 months later and Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway is $3 billion richer.  Exactly one year after Buffett stunned Wall Street with his massive vote of confidence for Goldman Sachs, his bold bet is producing gigantic profits.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson and Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke head to Capitol Hill to sell the $700 billion bailout plan. Warren Buffett invests $5 billion in Goldman Sachs. WaMu talks to suitors about a takeover.

  • Stocks hit new highs for 2009 after the weak dollar sent oil, gold and other commodities sharply higher.

  • While many Wall Street firms narrowly escaped Lehman’s fate some have emerged even stronger.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    Euphoria fades Monday as the market digests previous days' events. Japan's Mitsubishi seeks a piece of Morgan Stanley—killing hopes for a Morgan/Wachovia merger. And NYSE adds 30 stocks to the "no short" list.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    The Bush administration and Congress step up talks Sunday on an historic $700 billion bank bailout — racing the clock to stem further financial market turmoil.

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    The Treasury plans to re-create the Resolution Trust Corporation. Calpers says it will no longer loan out shares of  Goldman Sachs  and Morgan Stanley to short sellers. Central banks worldwide announce plans to support money markets.

  • Business Book of the Year

    Down to the final Six: The shortlist for the fifth annual Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award was announced today.

  • The markets continued to inch up yesterday, posting gains for the seventh time in 8 days and are looking up again this morning on the open.  While the Dow and S&P have mostly been up fractionally on those days over the past couple of weeks – string together those smaller gains, and notice they have rallied a notable 4% and 6%, respectively, since September 2.

  • One year ago today, "too big to fail" became a key topic of debate.  As the markets were already digesting the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy, the insolvency of Bear Stearns, Bank of America's buyout of Merrill Lynch, and the government takeover of Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae, the possibilities that no company was safe or too big to fail was on investors panic stricken minds.  When AIG received its first installment of bailout funds, failure was no longer an option.

  • It seems like the investors are struggling with a slew of tough questions about banks. But only one really matters; which bank should you own now?

  • This Day 1 Year Ago - A CNBC Special Report - See Complete Coverage

    On Tuesday, even "good" financials start out looking pretty bad: Goldman Sachs' earnings plunge and AIG scares investors again. But volatility makes the market hard to predict.