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Stocks Johnson & Johnson

  • Are the dog days of August ahead? Stocks pulled back from their highs of the week, with the S&P 500 off 0.85%, the Dow sliding 0.82% and the Nasdaq down 1.19%.

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    Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway was doing more selling than buying of stocks during the second quarter, but there is one new holding: New Jersey-based medical technology company Becton Dickinson.  Berkshire also added to its stake in Johnson & Johnson, although the holdings are still well below where they were before Buffett sold over 33 million shares last fall.

  • Cramer makes the call on viewers' favorite stocks.

  • After the S&P 500 hit its 2009 high last Friday, the major averages dropped marginally to start the week but the market remains close to its year-to-date high.

  • Pharma Stocks

    Critics have been saying for years that big pharma's been pi..., er, throwing away money on relatively unproductive research and development of new drugs. But a new study shows urine could eventually provide a new revenue stream.

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    A sigh of relief can be heard by all after two brutal years in the equity markets. But there is something interesting occurring that is gaining little attention. Companies with consistent, stable cash flow, (and not highly leveraged) are underperforming more risky leveraged assets. What's going on?

  • Douglas Roberts of Channel Capital Research.com and John Burns of Burns Advisory Group shared their market and economic outlooks—and how investors can make money.

  • Plus, get calls on the banks, natural gas and more.

  • The recovery trade continues today. Cyclicals are notably outperforming more defensive names once again, with the Morgan Stanley Cyclical Index is up 3 percent, while the Morgan Stanley Consumer Index is up just 0.75 percent. This extends the recent trend that has taken place during the current summer rally.

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    This Friday Merck and Schering-Plough shareholders are set to vote on the mega-merger. When companies co-mingle it's standard operating procedure for heads to roll. So-called "cost-saving synergies" are a big reason why deals like this get done. But this out-of-the-blue departure seems to have nothing to do with that.

  • Pharma Stocks

    Everyone’s talking about the July stock market rally. And, of course, you can’t overlook the outperformance of biotech—big and small.

  • Dividend yields in the S&P 500 are down since late June, as a 6% rally for the US equity index this month has pushed yields lower, and companies remain cautious about increasing their dividend payouts.

  • Plus, get calls on the industrials, credit cards, M&A and more.

  • The drug companies help pay my salary. Not directly, of course (although I bet there are conspiracy theorists out there who are probably convinced they do), but they undoubtedly contribute a sizeable amount of advertising dollars to the company I work for.

  • The latest batch of earnings took a toll on the market Friday but the Dow still pulled off a gain in the final half hour of trading, capping its best two-week performance since 2000. Microsoft shares fell more than 8%.

  • Stocks took a hit Friday as a drop in consumer sentiment exacerbated losses triggered by a disappointing round of earnings from Microsoft, Amazon and AmEx. But the Dow poked higher in afternoon trading Microsoft shares fell nearly 10%.

  • Stocks skidded Friday as a drop in consumer sentiment exacerbated losses triggered by a disappointing round of earnings from American Express, Amazon and Microsoft.

  • Many companies have reported earnings that have surprised to the upside, but how will they perform for the rest of the year? Dan Genter, CEO of RNC Genter Capital Management shared his insight and investment strategy.

  • Following are the week’s biggest winners and losers. Find out why shares of Goldman Sachs and Suncor Energy popped while Nokia dropped.

  • Investors should take a holiday from now on as the best part of the rally is over and now there are more chances that markets would go down, Marc Faber, author of the Gloom, Boom and Doom Report, told CNBC Friday.