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Stocks Microsoft Corp

  • Microsoft has seen big gains over the last few weeks, but can the world’s biggest software firm’s earnings after the bell on Thursday, keep the rally going despite a sluggish consumer market? Gregg Moskowitz, director and senior research analyst at Cowen & Company shared his insights.

  • U.S. stock index futures edged higher ahead of the open Thursday after a report that jobless claims fell to a three-month low, and in the wake of a mixed close in the previous session on worries over the Federal Reserve's next move on quantitative easing from its policy meeting next week.

  • With only hours until Microsoft releases earnings, how should you position into and in the wake of the report?

  • Stocks ended slightly higher, but remained at about the same place where they started Tuesday as investors held steady under a raft of earnings in anticipation of next week's elections and likely announcement of a new economic stimulus program from the Federal Reserve.

  • Stocks rose ahead of the market close Tuesday, led by consumer cyclical stocks. Stocks were pressured for most of the afternoon as investors held steady under a raft of earnings in anticipation of next week's elections and likely announcement of a new economic stimulus program from the Fed.

  • The analysts are wrong about this stock, Cramer said. And they have been wrong all the way up.

  • Stocks sold off in the final hour of trading but ended higher at the highest levels since late April, as the dollar slid. Worries about the foreclosure crisis continued to temper overall market gains.  DuPont and Kraft rose, while  BofA and JPMorgan fell.

  • Stocks pared gains but remained higher Monday as the weak dollar boosted materials, but big banks slumped following the continued fallout of the foreclosure crisis, tempering overall market gains. DuPont and Alcoa rose, while Bank of America and JPMorgan fell.

  • Stocks gained as a slide in the dollar boosted materials stocks, but a drop in financial stocks due to the continued fallout of the foreclosure crisis tempered gains. Alcoa and DuPont rose, while Bank of America and JPMorgan fell.

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    Lacking any big surprises, the markets may seem to be on cruise control in the coming week, as investors await the U.S. mid-term election and the Fed's November meeting.

  • There are many companies reporting earnings next week and on Friday, the "Fast Money" traders discussed which ones they'll be looking out for.

  • You might have heard about the note from JPMorgan predicting $100 oil soon. Fast trader Steve Cortes thinks the bank missed 'this.'

  • wii_150.jpg

    Two years ago, Nintendo could do no wrong. The Wii was at the height of its retail domination and competitors were scrambling for second place. Today it’s a much different story and the looming holiday season could be a crucial one that determines the strength – and perhaps the future - of the company’s core console business.

  • Here is a look at how the Dow components have fared since Lehman’s bankruptcy on September 15, 2008.

  • Scene from the Macbook Air ad.

    For the third time this year, reporters, analysts and the ever-faithful are gathering in Cupertino, California—home of Apple and where the company is hosting an event focusing on Mac computers.

  • Here's our Fast Money Final Trade. Our gang gives you tomorrow's best trades, right now!

  • Stocks plunged Tuesday on a report that a consortium that includes the New York Fed wants to force Bank of America to buy back $47 billion of mortgage bonds. BofA and Alcoa fell, while Coca-Cola rose.

  • Stocks continued to plunge Tuesday on a report that a consortium that includes the New York Fed wants to force Bank of America to buy back $47 billion of mortgage bonds. BofA and Alcoa fell, while Coca-Cola rose.

  • Apple iPhone 4

    Apple stock is trading lower after iPad and iPod numbers came in lower than Wall Street's sky-high expectations, but it turns out there are more important truths to glean from Apple's conference call.

  • It's been 23 years since the infamous stock market crash of October 19, 1987, which became known as "Black Monday." What began in Hong Kong, and spread to other parts of the world, including the United States, caused the Dow to drop 508 points, or nearly 23 percent.